Documentary tells story of one tiny house family living on remote island (Video)

KLCK
© KLCK

There's no doubt that technology has brought us some wonderful, exciting developments: a growing number of people are able to work as digital nomads; a growing number of smart tools that will help mitigate the effects of climate change, create better medicines and control our robot-assisted, hyper-connected smart homes.

But for a growing number of people, all this tech can be too much, as it was for Lynton and Pi Davidson, who were working long hours in the media industry. The couple and their children recently decided to restart their lives on a remote Scottish island, with a wonderful tiny house in tow, and their story is now being told in this short documentary called Tiny Boundaries, done by the filmmakers over at KLCK:

KLCK© KLCK

KLCK© KLCK

The move toward a more "analogue way of life" has seen the Davidsons spending more time outdoors, foraging wild plants for cooking and making kombucha, and rediscovering what it means to be connected to nature and community, rather than having their lives run by digital technology (as Lynton notes, there is very little cellphone reception and limited Internet on the island of Jura).

KLCK© KLCK

The idea to build a tiny house came about because the family, unsure of where they were going to be living, needed somewhere flexible they could work and stay in for periods. Their tiny house, which came as a collaboration between Dutch tiny house builder Liberté and Dutch tiny house designer Woonpioniers (previously), is designed as a mobile home and office / studio, a place to live, travel and work.

KLCK© KLCK

Completed earlier this year and towed from the Netherlands out to Scotland, the home is minimalistic, with clean lines and a receptacle for natural light, thanks to its huge windows on both sides.

It's equipped with a kitchen, shower room, compost toilet, sleeping loft, reconfigurable work space, and is powered by solar, gas and a wood-burning stove. The idea for the tiny home is that it functions as a shelter both on Jura and on the road, and as a place to work, where the couple could offer mobile workshops.

KLCK© KLCK

KLCK© KLCK

KLCK© KLCK

Oftentimes it's easy to get carried away focusing on the eye-candy that a well-designed tiny house offers up; here, we get a chance to peel back the layers and get a fascinating glimpse of how and why people transform their lives in such a way. To find out more, visit Tiny Boundaries; Liberté (Instagram and Facebook) and Woonpioniers.

[Via: Tiny House Talk]

Documentary tells story of one tiny house family living on remote island (Video)
This family lives, works and travels in this modern tiny house, now located on a remote Scottish island.

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