The Pequod is a whale of a tiny house for family of four

Rocky Mountain Homes
© Rocky Mountain Homes

There are so many images of tiny homes saturating the Internet now that it takes some original ideas to truly stand out from the crowd. Durango, Colorado based designer and tiny home builder Greg Parham of Rocky Mountain Homes built this family-sized tiny house that is surprisingly convincing as real family home, featuring two lofted bedrooms connected by a plexiglass catwalk.

Rocky Mountain Homes© Rocky Mountain Homes

Measuring 26 feet long, 8.5 feet wide and 13.5 feet tall, the 11,500-pound Pequod uses a drop axle trailer that allows an extra four inches to be added to the lofts' headroom, which is also maximized by the "whimsical" undulating roof. The walls are made out of structural insulated panels, and the ceiling layered with hand-formed Douglas Fir. There's a mini-greenhouse bumping out from the bathroom -- a clever addition.

Rocky Mountain Homes© Rocky Mountain Homes
Rocky Mountain Homes© Rocky Mountain Homes

The waviness of the roof and the exterior cladding is brought into the home, echoed in the custom hickory and walnut kitchen countertops. The flatware as upcycled drawer pulls are brilliant.

Rocky Mountain Homes© Rocky Mountain Homes
Rocky Mountain Homes© Rocky Mountain Homes
Rocky Mountain Homes© Rocky Mountain Homes

The dining/sitting area features a neat mobile dining table and seating, which can be tucked away when not needed.

Rocky Mountain Homes© Rocky Mountain Homes

The stairs leading up to the lofts doubles as storage, and is flanked by a number of porthole windows, alluding to the Pequod's namesake, a reference to the whaling ship of Moby Dick (which in itself references the Pequot, a Native American tribe that was decimated by the Puritans and their allies).

Rocky Mountain Homes© Rocky Mountain Homes

In the bathroom, which can often be a miserably lit space, the design focuses on this lovely little built-in greenhouse that also lets in a lot of light.

Rocky Mountain Homes© Rocky Mountain Homes

Here's a view of the sleeping areas -- there's a lot of room for both parents and kids (though we wonder about privacy for mom and dad!).

Rocky Mountain Homes© Rocky Mountain Homes
Rocky Mountain Homes© Rocky Mountain Homes

The beautiful curves are seen here from below, and it lends an almost cathedral-like feeling to the space. Parham notes that it was extremely complex and expensive to build (he declines to mention the price of the build because it was so expensive), but this is the real topping to the cake, and probably well worth it.

Rocky Mountain Homes© Rocky Mountain Homes

This is a real gem of a project, and shows that even a family with two kids can live tiny -- or at least tinier. More over at Rocky Mountain Homes.

Tags: Less Is More | Living With Less | Small Spaces

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