Storage-rich 290 sq. ft. Juniper tiny house uses advanced framing techniques

Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)
© Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)

The quest for financial freedom can manifest in many different ways, and for some, that may mean ditching the big house and the mortgage that comes with it, and downsizing to something smaller, maybe as small as a tiny house. But one big complaint about tiny houses is the lack of storage space. But we've seen that with a bit of creative design, it is possible to pack things in, without the feeling of a cluttered home.

One great example comes from this latest build by Backcountry Tiny Homes, run by wife-and-husband team Tina and Luke -- who also built their own tiny abode last year, which they now currently live in. Their new design, constructed for Alexis and Brian of Living the Tiny Dream and dubbed Juniper, includes a ton of storage, all hidden in a sleek, large-scale unit made from IKEA parts that incorporates a transforming seating area and foldaway table.

Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)© Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)
Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)© Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)

One of the nice things about the seating area is this hidden coffee table and ottoman, which can roll in and out of the way, under the couch.

Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)© Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)
Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)© Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)

The interesting thing here is that Alexis and Brian chose to do a "build-assist" with the company in the construction of their tiny home -- effectively saving some money and learning some valuable skills along the way. Here's what the couple had to say on Tiny House Talk about the reasons behind their shift to the tiny life:

[We wanted] a choice. We wanted to choose how we interact with and affect our environment, we wanted to be able to choose to spend time on the things and people that really matter to us, and lastly we wanted to choose financial freedom. One thing we have noticed about having debt, student loan, credit card, mortgage, etc. is it robs you of a choice. With the ‘normal’ lifestyle, work comes first, because without it there is no paying bills, affording a house, or taking care of yourself and others. We saw this as the best opportunity to break that cycle.

Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)© Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)

The kitchen, which occupies the space under the main sleeping loft, features a huge sink, a large refrigerator, an all-in-one washer, and a corner cabinet with convenient shelves that swing out for pantry storage.

Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)© Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)
Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)© Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)
Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)© Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)
Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)© Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)

Looking up the stairs to the loft, we see more storage incorporated within, plus a handy, elevated platform right at the entry door for storing your shoes before going up.

Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)© Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)

Upstairs, there's more storage, hidden in the floor.

Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)© Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)

The bathroom door incorporates a ladder to the secondary "reading loft," and inside, we have a shower and composting toilet.

Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)© Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)
Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)© Backcountry Tiny Homes (Treadway Photography)

But what's most interesting may be hidden in the walls themselves: the 290-square-foot (lofts included) Juniper uses a more advanced form of framing called ladder framing, which is still structurally sound, but saves on weight and material costs, limits thermal bridging and makes the process of insulation easier. The house also uses beetle-kill pine. With the "build-assist" option, Alexis and Brian's version of the Juniper came in at around USD $53,800 -- furnished and equipped with the appliances seen here. To see more information, visit Backcountry Tiny Homes.

[Via: Tiny House Talk, more on advanced framing here]

Tags: Less Is More | Living With Less | Small Spaces | United States

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