Sign Up for the 2020 Good Food Challenge

Public Domain. Unsplash / Ella Olsson

Switch to a planet-friendly diet this year, and show others how it can be done.

Greenpeace wants 2020 to be the year that Canadians change how they eat. It has created a Good Food Challenge that holds people accountable to cleaner, greener ways of eating, and then gathers their feedback on what worked and what didn't. This information will then be used to approach mayors across the country, in hopes of tackling flaws in the food system.

This approach is smart because it does not put all responsibility on the individual to fix the problems with the food system. It recognizes that individuals can only do so much – eat more local vegetables, consume less meat and dairy, minimize food waste at home, shop at farmers' markets and buy CSA shares, support fair worker wages, etc. – and that municipalities and other regional governments need to take action, too. But the only way they will do so is if they hear from informed citizens who can speak from experience.

Greenpeace explains why this is urgent, with up to 37 percent of greenhouse gas emissions attributed to global food production:

"Overconsumption of industrially farmed meat, excessive food loss and waste and lack of access to local fruits and veggies is causing deforestation, biodiversity loss and contributing to global climate change. As our climate heats up, reliance on a globalized, industrialized food system will become increasingly unsustainable and we risk widespread food insecurity."

Now is the time to change this, and even though it's already February, it's not too late to sign up for the Good Food Challenge. The feedback portion of the challenge was opened in mid-January, and in another few weeks you'll be able to invite your mayor to "step up to the plate and put good food policies on the table this year."

Learn more on the Greenpeace website, and peruse the Good Food Challenge's Pinterest page for plant-based menu ideas, ways to reduce food waste, and how to repurpose leftovers.