Durable prefab becomes a modern shelter in remote ski town

Art Lasovsky
© Art Lasovsky

Due to the fact that they are built off-site in a factory, then transported and quickly assembled on-site, prefabricated structures can greatly reduce construction waste and minimize the impact on the land. In the remote ski town of Kandalaksha, Russia, Moscow-based design studio BIO Artchitects has installed a modern Dubldom prefab shelter to replace an old tourists' cabin that had recently burned down.

Art Lasovsky© Art Lasovsky

According to the firm, the shelter was a gift for the town, as part of a competition that asked entrants to make a case why they should have a Dubldom installed, based on the criteria of the "future function of the house, social importance and life perception of the participant." The winner out of 500 entries was Alexander Trunkovkiy, who made a case for setting one on a hill near Kandalaksha, for visitors and locals to enjoy while skiing, hiking and sight-seeing.

Art Lasovsky© Art Lasovsky

To ensure that the modular unit could be transported by helicopter, the designers redesigned the original version of the Dubldom, using lighter, more durable and higher-quality materials in order to reduce the weight by half and to make sure the structure can survive the cold temperatures and high winds here.

Inside, the intimate but well-organized space can fit up to eight people at the same time. Heated by wood, the interior is zoned off into a storage area in the front for outer wear and gear; the other part of the building includes bunk beds and a dining area in the middle, and a kitchen. To make the space more flexible, the surfaces of the bunk beds can actually be dismantled to offer more room when needed.

Art Lasovsky© Art Lasovsky

Art Lasovsky© Art Lasovsky

Art Lasovsky© Art Lasovsky

Art Lasovsky© Art Lasovsky

Art Lasovsky© Art Lasovsky

Care was taken to emphasize the gorgeous view out the big, south-facing window by selecting a muted, more monochromatic palette for the inside. The orientation of the house toward the south means that it is also passively heated by the sun throughout the day.

Art Lasovsky© Art Lasovsky

To minimize disturbances on-site, the metal-framed structure rests on six posts instead of a concrete foundation, lifting it off the ground.

Ivan Ovchinnikov© Ivan Ovchinnikov

Galina Latushko© Galina Latushko

Art Lasovsky© Art Lasovsky

BIO Architects© BIO Architects

By going the prefab route here, construction time was greatly reduced for the town, in addition to environmental impact, without compromising on the quality, convenience or the cost. To find out more about Dubldom, visit BIO Artchitects.

[Via: ArchDaily]

Durable prefab becomes a modern shelter in remote ski town
Delivered as a replacement for a burned-down cabin, this modular structure is now a haven for visitors.

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