Adaptable kitchen-in-a-box is for cooking-challenged millennials

Nicola Tree
© Nicola Tree

With urban apartments getting smaller, kitchens are getting smaller as well. But this can actually be a good thing, as bigger kitchens are less environmentally friendly. On top of that, many millennials prefer to eat out rather than cooking at home, a more convenient choice (though the apparent lack of cooking know-how contributes to the phenomenon too).

Hoping to encourage kitchen-challenged millennials to cook more, Royal College of Art graduate Yu Li has created Assembly, a compact, multifunctional kitchen set for people who want to cook at home, but who might not have the space or the right set of tools to do so.

Nicola Tree© Nicola Tree
As Li explains on Dezeen, Assembly has been designed to tailor to all kinds of living situations, as an "alternative for adaptable domestic cooking":

The end users are millennials, young professionals who don't have sufficient kitchen space. They might be sharing the kitchen with others – facing the situation of 'kitchen traffic' – or living alone in a studio with a kitchenette. The idea is to trim the original kitchen space down to a few minimal elements so space can be designed simpler, neater and transformed into other purposes to increase the space utilization.

The items in the red and white kit have been carefully designed to coordinate with one another aesthetically and functionally. To make cooking easier, the induction stove has a timer, ignition and temperature controls.

Nicola Tree© Nicola Tree

Nicola Tree© Nicola Tree

Nicola Tree© Nicola Tree

Li was inspired to create the kit as a response to the standard kitchen, which is more geared toward traditional families living in single family homes. In Assembly, everything that is needed from the prepping, cooking and dish-washing process is included, and things have been made to incorporate more than one function.

Nicola Tree© Nicola Tree

For instance, the rear of the case can be taken out and used as a handy serving tray. The tray can also store a red container and a wooden board for chopping ingredients. After eating, the tray can also be used to collect water when the dish-drying rack is placed on top. The pan's handle is also removable and can be used as tongs.

Nicola Tree© Nicola Tree

Nicola Tree© Nicola Tree

Nicola Tree© Nicola Tree

Such a uncomplicated but efficient set-up not only encourages the user to to reduce food waste by keeping meals simple and made with fresher ingredients -- a potentially useful thing in an era where food tends to be over-processed, and cooking healthy, nourishing food at home can be a struggle. To see more, visit Royal College of Art and Yu Li.

Adaptable kitchen-in-a-box is for cooking-challenged millennials
This compact all-in-one cooking kit is looking to overhaul the traditional kitchen for today's hectic schedules and non-traditional living situations.

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