Artists' small tower loft expands with vertically stacked cubbies

Ewout Huibers
© Ewout Huibers

Urban loft spaces often suit creative types, as they lend well to flexible configurations or unusual interventions. Such is the case with this playful interior renovation of a tower on top of a historical department store that overlooks Dam Square in Amsterdam. Intended as accommodation for an artist's residency program, created by upscale Dutch retailer de Bijenkorf and the Dutch national Rijksmuseum, "Room on a Roof" features some clever ideas to maximize a small space with tall ceilings.

Ewout Huibers© Ewout Huibers

Designed by i29 Interior Architects, the concept utilizes a series of vertically stacked volumes that hold a kitchen, sleeping, work space and storage area.

Ewout Huibers© Ewout Huibers
Ewout Huibers© Ewout Huibers

Set against the original spiral staircase that leads up to the tower's cupola, the wall of wooden volumes are connected by ladders, leading to wooden cubby holding a bed -- overall, lending a feeling of an interior treehouse, blessed with great views of the city.

Ewout Huibers© Ewout Huibers
Ewout Huibers© Ewout Huibers
Ewout Huibers© Ewout Huibers
Ewout Huibers© Ewout Huibers

Artists, performers from all over the world will be invited to participate in the residency program. As Caroline Krouwels, Head of Creative at de Bijenkorf explains on ArchDaily:

De Bijenkorf integrates retail, art, culture and design in order to surprise and inspire customers. The tower is a prominent architectural component of the building on Dam Square and, with The Room On The Roof, it will also come to symbolize the creative innovation of de Bijenkorf.

It's a well-executed surprise, considering what the exterior of the building looks like. Here's a overall view and a closeup of the tower where this artist's residence now occupies.

Ewout Huibers© Ewout Huibers
BijenkorfFbcnl/Public Domain

It's a clever and unexpected intervention that's been well-conceived, and remakes what would probably have been a dead space due to the small footprint. See more over at ArchDaily and i29 Interior Architects.

Tags: Architecture | Netherlands | Small Spaces

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