This clever redesign fits a 'mini-house' in a small apartment

Sweng Lee
© Sweng Lee

As real estate prices rise and land to build more housing dwindles, smaller and more affordable apartments are becoming a big trend in many cities around the world. But how to gain more space out of a small apartment in a crowded island metropolis? Looking to create a "mini-house" of their own within an existing building with 800 apartment units, Singapore's Nitton Architects have managed to create quite a spacious living situation by taking down non-structural walls and adding some space-saving elements.

Sweng Lee© Sweng Lee

Sweng Lee© Sweng Lee

As the architects Liting Lee and Khoon Toong Chow explain on Dezeen, the idea was to create "a mini house out of a humble flat unit" by creating an open-plan layout:

We wanted a seamless flow of light and space emulating the experience of landed housing that goes beyond the typical confines of apartment living.

The layout is open and flexible: the master bedroom and master bathroom has been placed all the way at one end, separated from the rest of the home by a glass wall. The guest bedroom and its bathroom is sandwiched between the master bedroom and the living room; however, when it's not in use, the two guest beds (one of them a roll-out trundle bed, another a Murphy-style bed) can be put out of the way, creating a free space to use. In addition, an indoor garden (formerly a corridor) in this area helps to bring greenery and light into this more private part of the home.

Sweng Lee© Sweng Lee

Sweng Lee© Sweng Lee

The guest room can all be enclosed with these sliding doors. There are convenient book racks built into the door to the walk-in wardrobe, as seen here. Along the same wall, is a door leading into the guest bathroom.

Sweng Lee© Sweng Lee

Sweng Lee© Sweng Lee

Sweng Lee© Sweng Lee

The kitchen is divided from the living room by a half-wall. Integrated wall shelving in the dining area helps to keep visual clutter under control. The apartment's toned down palette of whites, greys and bits of warmer textures and hues also helps to keep things feeling calm and peaceful.

Sweng Lee© Sweng Lee

Sweng Lee© Sweng Lee

Nitton Architects© Nitton Architects

The redesign is simple but effective: by eliminating unnecessary barriers and adding transformable elements, the space becomes a larger and more adaptable place to live and enjoy. To learn more, visit Nitton Architects.

This clever redesign fits a 'mini-house' in a small apartment
These architects created house-like feeling in this apartment unit by knocking some walls down, and adding some hidden features.

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