Adaptable 516 sq. ft. attic apartment gets its own floating atrium

Ruetemple
© Ruetemple

From Manhattan, to Paris and Barcelona, city apartments can be small, cramped and lacking in some kind of outdoor balcony space. But one can always find a design solution, as the Russian designer duo Ruetemple did with this magnificent renovation of an attic loft space in Moscow, transforming it into a light-filled home, complete with its own inner garden.

Ruetemple© Ruetemple

Architects Alexander Kudimov and Daria Butahina write over at ArchDaily about their concept, which features a clever central volume that hides a bunch of transformer-type pieces of furniture:

We propose creating a multifunctional space where you can make a choice: either to retire or be together with everybody. The space, clear of all unnecessary items, will take you to another dimension and help you to get tuned to a calm repose. Lots of light and air.

Ruetemple© Ruetemple
Ruetemple© Ruetemple
Ruetemple© Ruetemple
Ruetemple© Ruetemple

They call that central spatial element a "functional zoning volume" -- a white core that partitions the 516-square-foot apartment into five distinct zones: one for "active pastimes", another for watching television, another for relaxing, dressing and a central, atrium-like relaxation and meditation area, right inside the white cube with a living tree.

Ruetemple© Ruetemple

The sky-lit cube is elevated, allowing for the storage of mobile modules underneath, which can be moved around and composed into an impromptu sitting area, or set up for bedtime. With this movable furniture, different 'zones' can be created to fit what's needed in the moment -- a great way to extend what would have otherwise been a cramped space.

Ruetemple© Ruetemple
Ruetemple© Ruetemple
Ruetemple© Ruetemple
Ruetemple© Ruetemple

This design's floating core is reminiscent of traditional courtyards where residents would have immediate access to an outdoor space within the confines of home. Here, it's superimposed on top of what would be a conventional sitting area, hiding the sofa, and acting as a space divider that can also be occupied as a space. It's an ingenious design that makes a small space feel that much larger and even brings in a bit of living green; see more over at Ruetemple.

Tags: Apartments | Russia

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