Little 376 sq. ft. apartment in old city center is transformed

Maksim Sosnov
© Maksim Sosnov

How to create a home for a young couple in only 376 square feet (35 square metres)? Ukraine's Replus Design Bureau transformed this tiny space in the heart of Lviv into a modern space that feels fresh and tailored to the life rhythms of the two clients, who work as architects.

Every inch of the space has been utilized, including the high ceilings. To create more space for the living room and storage below, the sleeping space has been lofted above, creating a more intimate and layered feel. The photos require some time to figure out -- it's because the designers have used mirrored walls and cabinets to diffuse the lighting all over.

Maksim Sosnov© Maksim Sosnov

Maksim Sosnov© Maksim Sosnov

Maksim Sosnov© Maksim Sosnov

Maksim Sosnov© Maksim Sosnov

Maksim Sosnov© Maksim Sosnov

Off to the main area is the kitchen, which has an island that functions as the centre of communication. The laminated plywood island is made to transform: either by sliding out into something bigger for more guests, or pushed into something more compact. All furniture in the apartment has been custom-made to fill irregular nooks and crannies to efficiently maximize space.

Maksim Sosnov© Maksim Sosnov

Maksim Sosnov© Maksim Sosnov

Maksim Sosnov© Maksim Sosnov

Maksim Sosnov© Maksim Sosnov

Maksim Sosnov© Maksim Sosnov

As one can see by the exposed brick walls in the main living area and the bathroom, care was taken to retain some of the flat's original characteristics as much as possible, such as old Austrian parquet, brick walls, and a glass-brick wall and roof in the bathroom dating back to the Soviet era.

Maksim Sosnov© Maksim Sosnov

Maksim Sosnov© Maksim Sosnov

Maksim Sosnov© Maksim Sosnov

Adapted to the particular lifestyle of its two occupants, this simply but tastefully redone apartment carries a bit of the old forward into something new and personalized. To see more, visit Replus Design Bureau's website, Facebook and Instagram.

[Via: Design Milk]

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