Floor of ceramics store is built up from 25,000 repurposed rejected plates, cups and bowls

Now this is creative recycling/repurposing/reusing or whatever R you want to apply. They have been making ceramics in the Japanese town of Hasami for 400 years, and there is no outlet mall for them to sell their seconds and their defects. So for years, they have been throwing them into pits called monohara (物原). However for the new flagship store for Maruhiro, designer Yusuke Seki put all these rejects to use, building a platform of defective and rejected pottery inside the store. According to Spoon and Tamago,

But by re-purposing these pieces, Seki created his own monohara within the context of a retail shop, conveying the history, fragility and legacy of Hasami ceramics.

floor detail closeup© Takumi Ota via Spoon and Tamago

They go into greater detail in Dezeen, where one learns that most defects are rejected before they are glazed, so all of the pieces were glazed in the same neutral coloring. They were then filled to the brim with concrete to give them the strength to be stacked into a surface that would hold the weight of the customers. The designer tells Dezeen:

maruhiru floor head on view© Takumi Ota via Spoon and Tamago

The conceptual and experiential focus of the design is a stacked central platform, layers of locally sourced imperfect tableware and poured concrete. A minimal design interference – a modification in the level of the floor – not only utilises the pre-existing space to alter the perspective and experiences held by the users until the present, but also gives birth to an entirely new sense of flow within.

Maruhiru floor with walker© Takumi Ota via Spoon and Tamago

Just don't wear high heels. More images at Spoon and Tamago,

Tags: Japan | Recycling | renovation

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