This beautiful, simple drying rack is made by Bee's Wrap

Bee's Wrap drying rack
© Bee's Wrap

It is designed to dry beeswax wraps more easily, but its usefulness goes beyond that.

We all know how terrible plastic is for the environment, but can we take a moment to acknowledge how ugly it is, too? You'll never see a heap of Ziploc bags or Tupperware containers in the corner of a beautifully staged kitchen photo, nor a garish plastic drying rack. That's because no one wants to look at that stuff. But if you swap out the plastic for something natural and handmade, you get kitchen tools that are not only useful, but aesthetically pleasing, too – items that could very well show up in a photo shoot.

For the past several weeks, I've been enjoying looking at a new drying rack that was sent to me by Bee's Wrap, a Vermont-based company that's working to reduce kitchen plastic. Made of six slim pieces of maple that fit together in a clever X-shaped design, it is meant for drying beeswax wraps more efficiently. (If you own any – and I hope you do – you'll know how annoying it is to drape/lean them on other dishes to dry properly.) I have discovered the rack is also perfect for drying water bottles, mugs, and glasses.

Apparently Bee's Wrap's goal with the new rack is to "ease the ritual of caring for reusables," as these require added steps from individuals who refuse to throw things away (how nice, and so true!). This drying rack "sets up to do the job using less work area than standard dish racks" and assembles in seconds. It can be disassembled just as quickly for flat, compact storage, in a bundle no bigger than a rolling pin.

drying rack pieces© Bee's Wrap

When the rack is not obstructed by wraps and bottles, it looks almost like a piece of art on the counter that ties in beautifully to my maple cabinets. Numerous visitors have commented on it, asking where I got it. They've also quizzed me on the wraps themselves, which are thick yet pliable and highly secure. A friend visiting from California, who'd bought a set of cheap beeswax wraps from Trader Joe's and thought they "didn't work", said these felt completely different and were clearly of much higher quality. I've used Bee's Wraps to store everything from fruit and cheese to cookies and muffins in a kid's lunch.

For a greener, plastic-free kitchen, check out here what Bee's Wrap makes and sells. All wraps are reusable, biodegradable, and compostable. They can be cut into strips for composting or wrapped around kindling for fire starter at the end of their life. The drying rack has a non-toxic whey-based coating that is stain-resistant. I doubt you'll be disappointed.

Bee's Wrap on loaf of bread© Bee's Wrap

This beautiful, simple drying rack is made by Bee's Wrap
It is designed to dry beeswax wraps more easily, but its usefulness goes beyond that.

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