Eat fresh microgreens every day, thanks to MicroFarm

MicroFarm
© MicroFarm (used with permission)

This clever countertop module produces a steady crop of crunchy, nutritious sprouts.

Nothing beats freshly harvested greens in a salad, sandwich or wrap – except, perhaps, being able to skip the store and harvest them in the comfort of your own kitchen. Thanks to the new MicroFarm, you will soon be able to do this.

MicroFarm is the brainchild of Mother, an international network of young designers and entrepreneurs on a mission to make people's lives more self-sufficient. In their quest to make healthy food more accessible to the general public, the MicroFarm was born.

It is described as a 'plug-and-play' module that uses only water and an LED light. You sprinkle the paper towel-covered tray with sprouts and keep it damp by spraying with water daily. On day 3, the light is turned on for 12-14 hours per day. Within 7 to 10 days, there will be a crop of microgreens ready for harvesting. Sprouts can be stored for up to 2 weeks in the fridge.

The system works year-round, providing a steady source of fresh, crunchy nutrients that come in a range of flavors, from anise to mustard to broccoli. Microgreens are said to be 40 times more nutritionally dense than other vegetables because of their young age. Nutrition Facts cites a study that found "red cabbage microgreens have a 6-fold higher vitamin C concentration than mature red cabbage and 69 times the vitamin K."

The problem, though, is that people tend to eat them in much smaller quantities, and thus do not reap all the nutritional benefits – unless, of course, you have your own tasty crop at hand and can add them to almost everything you make.

The MicroFarm goes on sale on May 10, when its Kickstarter campaign launches. At that point you can order one for €89 (US$99), which is half off the final selling price. More info on website.

Eat fresh microgreens every day, thanks to MicroFarm
This clever countertop module produces a steady crop of crunchy, nutritious sprouts.

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