Multi-level lakeside cabin recomposes relationship to nature

Sugawaradaisuke Architects
© Sugawaradaisuke Architects

Most houses are built with a pretty clear demarcation between inside and out. It's more convenient to build, but unfortunately, often leads to people feeling a bit cut off from their natural surroundings. Aiming to construct a lakeside home that welcomes nature in, rather than shutting it out, Japanese studio Sugawaradaisuke created a cabin that uses multiple, interlocking levels that offers its occupants more fluid interactions with each other and the outdoors.

Sugawaradaisuke Architects© Sugawaradaisuke Architects

Seen over at Dezeen, the house is called Nojiri-ko Nature Platforms and is built near Lake Noriji in Japan's Nagano Prefecture. It's not immediately apparent, but there are actually five different levels inside the house, overlapping and repositioning themselves over one another around the home's three-dimensional grid in unexpected ways, as the designers explain:

The design target was generating a new lifestyle in the midst of natural landscape by recomposing relationships between nature, buildings, objects and human beings. Layering platforms rearranges the hierarchy of landscape, site, building, furniture and object together with generating new living space in nature.

This surprising juxtaposition of layers can be best seen at the level of the main living area, where the floor of the sitting area eventually becomes part of the kitchen, as the table.

Sugawaradaisuke Architects© Sugawaradaisuke Architects

Sugawaradaisuke Architects© Sugawaradaisuke Architects

Sugawaradaisuke Architects© Sugawaradaisuke Architects

Sugawaradaisuke Architects© Sugawaradaisuke Architects

Behind the main living area is the master bedroom, which is overlooked by a loft space that's accessible by ladder.

Sugawaradaisuke Architects© Sugawaradaisuke Architects

Sugawaradaisuke Architects© Sugawaradaisuke Architects

On the lowest level, there is a more outdoor-oriented volume of space that's been carved out from the main mass of the home, facing the lake. This volume is partitioned into a sheltered outdoor area that features a wooden deck and swing; and then behind the sliding glass doors, a more 'interior' space used for chopping and storing firewood.

Sugawaradaisuke Architects© Sugawaradaisuke Architects

Sugawaradaisuke Architects© Sugawaradaisuke Architects

Sugawaradaisuke Architects© Sugawaradaisuke Architects

With its large windows and emphasis on layered spaces, it's an unconventional cabin that encourages its inhabitants shift perspectives in the midst of nature; to see more, visit Sugawaradaisuke Architects.

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