Mirrored rammed earth dwelling blends itself into the background

Tatiana Bilbao
© Tatiana Bilbao

Shiny, mirrored exterior walls have been a bit of an architectural trope for some time now, appearing in skyscrapers, treehouses and art galleries alike, rendering them almost invisible as they reflect and blend into their surroundings.

Dezeen shows us this striking, mirrored dwelling in Monterrey, Mexico, by architect Tatiana Bilbao.

Tatiana Bilbao© Tatiana Bilbao
Made with rammed earth and clay bricks, the home is nestled in a forested area. While the inhabitants can still see to the outside through the glass walls, the project's reflective surface allows its bulk -- which is split into two structures sited around a man-made pool -- to integrate more seamlessly into its environment, says Bilbao:

The house program is fragmented according to each component's function and role within the site, but they are all enclosed in a perfect square in the general plan. The mirrored glass envelope simultaneously reflects and contains the lush surrounding.

Tatiana Bilbao© Tatiana Bilbao

Tatiana Bilbao© Tatiana Bilbao

One of the structures houses the kitchen, dining area and living room. The doors here can open wide to welcome the outside in. There is a distinctive, ceramic latticed wall here that partially separates the spaces:

The lattice was designed to adapt according to different spatial connections and structural possibilities. It works as solid and permeable floor, a screen partition, a structural wall, and as a semi-open wall that allows ventilation and sunlight to bathe the interior spaces.

Tatiana Bilbao© Tatiana Bilbao

Tatiana Bilbao© Tatiana Bilbao

Tatiana Bilbao© Tatiana Bilbao

Tatiana Bilbao© Tatiana Bilbao

Tatiana Bilbao© Tatiana Bilbao

On the other side of the site sits the other structure, which contains two bedrooms. These are placed on wooden terraces that echo the hilly landscape, yet also serve as hidden places for storing things.

Tatiana Bilbao© Tatiana Bilbao

Tatiana Bilbao© Tatiana Bilbao

Tatiana Bilbao© Tatiana Bilbao

It's an intriguing project that integrates itself into the landscape as much as possible. The one big caveat that it also might be a bird-killer; as commenters have pointed out previously on similar projects, birds will often crash into reflective surfaces, unless some preventative measures are taken. To tackle this problem, other projects have applied special film that is visible to birds, while others have installed artificial bird predators on the roofs to scare birds away. Find out more at Tatiana Bilbao.

Mirrored rammed earth dwelling blends itself into the background
The reflective glass walls hide the bulk of this home in Mexico.

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