Bright Dutch coach house renovation reuses materials from demolished building (Video)

Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen
© Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen

Part of the appeal of reusing salvaged materials in building new things is that the exercise can challenge your creative muscles -- you never know what you're going to get. In Utrecht, architect Rolf Bruggink recently purchased a property with both a wooden office building dating back to the 1950s and a coach house from 1895. In demolishing the office building, he chose to reuse its materials in the renovation of the coach house, resulting in a playful yet modern space. See this time-lapse video of the deconstruction of the old building as it's remade into something totally different:


House of Rolf from rolf bruggink on Vimeo.

Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen© Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen

Bruggink collaborated with architect Niek Wagemans to remake the interior of the coach house into a luminous yet down-to-earth space for living and working from. The idea of being able to rehabilitate old things was key, Bruggink tells Wallpaper:

The principle of transformation is most important to me. The notion that an existing building can be adapted so as to take on an entirely new countenance is something that fascinates me.

With the coach house measuring a wide-open 538 square feet, the designers created a more intimate atmosphere by inserting a series of enclosed, suspended volumes that separate the house into zones, with the bedroom, bathroom and office, overlooking the open air spaces of kitchen and living room. A large window has been carved out of the existing coach house wall to let more natural lighting in.

Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen© Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen
Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen© Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen

Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen© Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen
Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen© Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen

Got to love the bathtub as the crowning touch here.

Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen© Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen

There's a nice contrast between the modern-industrial aesthetic of the coach house and the salvaged materials used, and a balanced rhythm to how the functional volumes of bed, bath, etc. break down the tall height of the place.

Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen© Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen
Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen© Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen
Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen© Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen
Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen© Rolf Bruggink & Christel Derksen

We already know that the greenest building is the one that's already standing, and perhaps the second greenest thing to do if you really have to build something else is to reuse components from an existing building. So while reusing salvaged materials may take a little more time, planning and creative muscle, it's clear from instances like this beautiful renovation project that it's well worth the extra effort. More over at Wallpaper, Rolf Bruggink and Niek Wagemans

Tags: Green Building | Netherlands | Recycled Building Materials

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