10 Climbing Vines for a Boho-Chic Container Garden

Sweet peas climbing up a trellis made of twigs

MartaJonina / Getty Images

There is something magical about a climbing vine in a garden. Vines seem to have a mind of their own and go completely wild with just a little bit of love. And, just because you are limited to a balcony or a small outdoor space doesn't mean you need to miss out on the carefree vibe that climbing vines imbue.

The 10 vines here, from moonflower to common grape vine, are all suitable for container gardens — all you need is a big pot and something for it to climb up. Generally, a few sticks of bamboo will do. For more artful climbing, you can look into twining, netting or strings, or a trellis.

Here are 10 gorgeous climbing vines for a flowing, boho-chic container garden.

Some of the plants on this list are toxic to pets. For more information about the safety of specific plants, consult the ASPCA's searchable database.

1
of 10

Black-Eyed Susan Vine (Thunbergia alata)

A light pink, five-petaled black-eyed Susan in full bloom is surrounded by green leaves of the vine
Juliette Wade / Getty Images

The fast-growing black-eyed Susan vine, also called the thunbergia or clock vine, adds a little drama to any garden with its solid black eye, framed by sunny yellow, white, or bold orange flowers. They're easy to grow from seed, prefer full sun, and grow six to eight feet tall.

Plant Care Tips

  • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 11.
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade.
  • Soil Needs: Organically rich, fertile, medium moisture, and well-drained.
2
of 10

Common Grape Vine (Vitis vinifera)

The treelike common grape vine arches its green leaf covered branches over the window of a cottage

Raimund Kutter / Getty Images

A woody vine native to southwestern Asia, the common grape vine produces a harvestable fruit that is not only a pleasure to look at but downright delicious. These impressive grapes can be eaten fresh off the vine, dried into raisins, or pressed into wine, among other uses.

Plant Care Tips

  • USDA Growing Zones: 6 to 9.
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun.
  • Soil Needs: Deep, loamy, humus-rich, medium moisture, and well-drained.
3
of 10

Heavenly Blue Morning Glory (Ipommoea tricolor)

Blue morning glory bloom on a leafy vine

nipastock / Getty Images

Best in full sun and easy to grow from seed, the heavenly blue morning glory blooms all summer long — up to 10 weeks — and can grow an ambitious 12 feet high. Morning glories come in several color options, but the contrast of the blue and white here is particularly stunning.

Plant Care Tips

  • USDA Growing Zones: 2 to 11.
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun.
  • Soil Needs: Average, consistently moist, and well-drained.
4
of 10

Konigskind (Clematis climador)

The purple flower of the Konigskind vine sits in full bloom surrounded by a background of blurred greenery

Alexandre Dulaunoy / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

Boasting clusters of lovely violet-blue blossoms, the konigskind climbing vine is a relatively new addition to the perennial container garden market, meaning it is bred to be in a pot, with a long blooming period. Its gorgeous flowers bloom throughout the summer season and attract bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies.

Plant Care Tips

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 9.
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade.
  • Soil Needs: Average and well-drained.
5
of 10

Sweet Pea Vine (Lathyrus odoratus)

Gorgeously vibrant sweet pea flowers hang from the vine
BrendaLawlor / Getty Images

The small blossoms of the perennial sweet pea vine look like dozens of tiny orchids (about one inch in diameter). But unlike orchids, they are ready to face the elements of your balcony or terrace. Traditionally, the sweet pea vine boasts purple flowers, but newer varieties include blue, red, pink, white, and bicolor.

Plant Care Tips

  • USDA Growing Zones: 2 to 11.
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun.
  • Soil Needs: Rich, humusy, medium moisture, and well-drained.
6
of 10

Trumpet Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens)

Pink trumpet honeysuckle flowers grow on a vine-covered wall

Bruce Kirchoff / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

A stunning honeysuckle vine, the trumpet honeysuckle features an orangish-red, fluted flower that blossoms in late spring. When left unpruned the vines can reach a height of 10 to 15 feet, so it is exceptional for growing on fences. The vines are a bluish-green color that contrasts beautifully with the bright, showy blossoms.

Plant Care Tips

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 9.
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun.
  • Soil Needs: Average, medium moisture, and well-drained.
7
of 10

Great Bougainvillea (Bougainvillea spectabilis)

Bright pink bougainvillea flowers droop over an old, wooden fence

Jchatoff / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

The great bougainvillea is a thorny, shrubby vine that can be easily grown in smaller spaces like porches due to its compactness. It takes well to pruning, but be careful to wear gloves when doing so, so as not to get poked by its teethy, one- to two-inch-long thorns.

Plant Care Tips

  • USDA Growing Zones: 9 to 11.
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun.
  • Soil Needs: Acidic and well-drained.
8
of 10

Boston Ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata)

Orangish-red leaves grow on a brick wall along a tree-lined street

Geoff McKay / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Accepting of a wide range of soils, Boston ivy is an easy to grow climbing vine that prefers the shade of north-facing walls. Its sticky, adhesive holdfasts attach themselves to whatever surface they can reach, whether it be a trellis, fence, or university building. Boston ivy adorns the campuses of many universities in the Northeast United States, hence the name "Ivy League."

Plant Care Tips

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 8.
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade.
  • Soil Needs: Average, dry to medium, and well-drained.
9
of 10

Moonflower (Ipomoea alba)

Three white moonflowers peek out of a mass of vines

Katja Schulz / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

At home adorning a fence or growing from a hanging basket, the moonflower vine features striking, white flowers that bloom at dusk. The nocturnal flowers stay open throughout the night before closing up by noon each day. As an annual, the vine will climb anywhere between 10 to 15 feet per season.

Plant Care Tips

  • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 12.
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun.
  • Soil Needs: Moist and well-drained.
10
of 10

Trumpet Creeper (Campis radicans)

The fluted, trumpet creeper vine flowers show off their orangish-red colors

GA-Kayaker / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

The trumpet creeper, a woody vine native to the southeastern United States, is a vivacious climber that can reach between 30 and 40 feet high. Hummingbirds are attracted to its beautiful, red trumpet-shaped flowers that bloom from June until September. The trumpet creeper grows optimally in lean soils with partial shade.

Plant Care Tips

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 9.
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade.
  • Soil Needs: Lean to average with regular moisture.