DIY Honey Face Masks: 5 Recipes for Nourished, Glowing Skin

Home Spa skin care ingredients. Glass jars of oatmeal and yellow honey, a white towel for the bathroom. There is a lavender flower in the background. Side view. Sunlight. Dripping honey.
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Long considered a wonderful ingredient to add into tea or take by the spoonful when you're feeling under the weather, honey is a delicious and powerful elixir that can offer wide-reaching benefits beyond its sweetness and flavor.

Honey also is a sought-after ingredient in the world of skin care. The golden liquid is packed with antioxidants that act as powerful anti-aging agents and help fight wrinkles, in addition to its natural antibacterial properties. When used directly on the skin, it will leave it feeling soft and silky.

Here are five recipes for honey face masks that you can make from a few simple ingredients found in your kitchen.

Treehugger Tip

Honey that still contains all its healthy bacteria is the most effective. Make sure to choose raw, organic honey to maximize its benefits.

1
of 5

Exfoliating Honey and Oatmeal Mask

Homemade honey and oatmeal face mask in wooden bowl with spoon
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Like honey, oatmeal is a food that offers so much more than just dietary benefits. Oatmeal is abundant in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds that can help soothe dry and irritated skin. In addition, ground oatmeal is a fantastic exfoliant, helping to scrub away dead skin cells and dirt.

This three-ingredient mask will gently exfoliate your face, balance your complexion, and leave your skin feeling soft and fresh.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup oats
  • 2-3 tablespoons plain yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon honey

Steps

  1. In a blender or food processor, blend the oats until they're finely ground.
  2. In a small bowl, mix together the oats and all the remaining ingredients.
  3. Apply to a freshly washed face in a circular motion and leave for 10-15 minutes.
  4. Rinse off with warm water and follow with a gentle moisturizer.

You can use the mask once a week, but it's best to make a fresh batch every time.

2
of 5

Brightening Honey and Banana Face Mask

Homemade facial mask from banana, plain yogurt and honey
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Bananas are packed with potassium and vitamins A, C, and B-6, which are fantastic for moisturizing and brightening skin. Combined with the anti-inflammatory qualities of honey, the anti-oxidant and antimicrobial properties of turmeric, and the gentle exfoliating effects of yogurt, you'll have the perfect concoction to brighten and soften tired-looking skin.

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon raw honey
  • 1 ripe banana (peel included)
  • 1 teaspoon plain, full-fat yogurt
  • 1/4 teaspoon turmeric

Steps

  1. The key to this mask's success is the banana peel, where most of the fruit's nutrients live. Carefully slice the peel with a knife and then mash the peel and the banana with a fork in a small bowl.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients and mix together until they become a thick, yellow paste.
  3. Apply a thin layer of the mask onto your freshly cleaned face.
  4. After you've let the mask rest on your skin for about 20 minutes, rinse your face with warm water and gently pat it dry.

Use a light moisturizer on your face after the mask and notice how much softer your skin feels.

Note that the turmeric might leave a faint yellow tint on your skin if you have a fair complexion, but it will go away within a day or so.

3
of 5

Nourishing Honey and Olive Oil Mask

Closeup on honey spa therapy ingredients and salt spa objects
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Olive oil is fantastic for dry skin and contains a number of antioxidants, including vitamin E. The combination of honey and olive oil will leave your face feeling luscious.

Adding a natural oil to the honey not only helps with a smoother application of the mask, but it also moisturizes and soothes the skin. You can choose to change out the olive oil for another natural oil such as jojoba or argan oil, depending on your skin type and personal preference.

To prepare this easy face mask, mix equal parts oil and honey. Add a few drops of essential oil for a nice aroma to the mask if you'd like. Earthy scented patchouli oil is a fantastic addition, as it benefits dry, cracked skin and boasts many therapeutic properties.

Apply your honey and oil mask evenly on a freshly washed face and let it sit for about 20 minutes before rinsing off with warm water.

4
of 5

Soothing Honey, Avocado, and Lavender Mask

avocado with honey
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The combination of ingredients in this mask is the perfect antidote for red and irritated skin.

The fatty acids found in coconut oil and avocado deeply hydrate and calm your skin. Mixed with the antioxidants from the honey and a few drops of lavender essential to soothe any redness, this mask smells as delicious as it feels.

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon coconut oil
  • 1/4 ripe avocado
  • 2 drops of lavender oil

Steps

  1. Mash the avocado in a small bowl and mix it up with the remaining ingredients.
  2. Use a face mask brush to paint a layer of the mask on your face and let it sit for about 20 minutes.
  3. Rinse off with warm water and admire how soft and silky your skin feels.
5
of 5

Clarifying Honey and Lemon Mask

High Angle View Of Honey And Lemon Against Yellow Background

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An effective skin care routine doesn't have to break the bank and can easily take advantage of ingredients found in your kitchen.

Lemon is rich in vitamin C, which may help reduce skin damage and can also reduce the oil in your skin. This simple, two-ingredient mask will leave your skin feeling clean, refreshed, and hydrated.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 organic lemon
  • 1 tablespoon organic raw honey

Steps

  1. Squeeze half a lemon in a bowl with a tablespoon of honey and mix well.
  2. Apply the mask to your face with your fingers or with a face mask brush.
  3. Let your skin soak up all the nutrients from the mask for 15-30 minutes, depending on how sensitive your skin is.
  4. Rinse off with cool water and follow up with a gentle moisturizer.

Warning

Lemon juice can have a phototoxic reaction on the skin when it interacts with ultraviolet light, causing a lesion that may look like a rash or severe burn. Make sure you rinse this mask off completely and avoid sun exposure or use it only before bed.

View Article Sources
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  3. Reynertson, Kurt A., et al. "Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Colloidal Oatmeal (Avena sativa) Contribute to the Effectiveness of Oats in Treatments of Itch Associated with Dry, Irritated Skin." Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, vol. 14, no. 1, 2015, pp. 43-48.

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  7. Swamy, Mallappa Kumara and Uma Rani Sinniah. "A Comprehensive Review on the Phytochemical Constituents and Pharmacological Activities of Pogostemon cablin Benth.: An Aromatic Medicinal Plant of Industrial Importance." Molecules, vol. 20, no. 5, 2015, pp. 8521-8547., doi:10.3390/molecules20058521

  8. Mioduszewski, Margaret, and Jennifer Beecker. "Phytophotodermatitis from Making Sangria: a Phototoxic Reaction to Lime and Lemon Juice." Canadian Medical Association Journal, vol. 187, no. 10, 2015, pp. 756., doi:10.1503/cmaj.140942