Complex geometric tessellations are folded from a single sheet of paper (Video)

Ekaterina Lukasheva
© Ekaterina Lukasheva

When one thinks about the art of folding paper origami, one typically might associate it with paper cranes, or perhaps other animal forms. But there's a new kind of origami that's becoming quite popular: origami tessellations. These are patterns that are folded over and over again, forming a three-dimensional tiling that's quite delightful to behold.

Moscow-based paper artist Ekaterina Lukasheva is someone who has been experimenting with origami since she was 14 years old. At that time, a mathematics teacher brought in a book on folding kusudamas (literally "medicine balls"), which are spherical decorations made up of smaller folded paper forms, attached together with the help of glue or thread.

Ekaterina Lukasheva © Ekaterina Lukasheva

Lukasheva then began exploring the fascinating geometric forms of tessellations through paper folding, which combine her love for mathematics with the tactile pleasure that working with paper can bring. Watch how some of Lukasheva's designs morph and change shape and colour:

Ekaterina Lukasheva © Ekaterina Lukasheva
Ekaterina Lukasheva © Ekaterina Lukasheva
Ekaterina Lukasheva © Ekaterina Lukasheva
Ekaterina Lukasheva © Ekaterina Lukasheva

It boggles the mind that such complex patterns are possible with a single flat piece of paper, and by using some basic folding techniques. With these deceivingly simple components -- paper and some folding -- one can create a variety of twisting, interweaving, swirling, radiating shapes, with valleys and peaks ad infinitum.

Ekaterina Lukasheva © Ekaterina Lukasheva
Ekaterina Lukasheva © Ekaterina Lukasheva
Ekaterina Lukasheva © Ekaterina Lukasheva

In addition to these gorgeous origami designs, Lukasheva also has a degree in mathematics and computer programming, and has written several books that offer instructions on how to fold kusudamas. Check out more of Ekaterina Lukasheva's work on her website, Instagram and Flickr.

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