Paper artist's flocks of winged wildlife are cut from vintage maps

Claire Brewster
© Claire Brewster

Since its invention almost two thousand years ago, paper has become indispensable for all manner of things, from recording texts and ideas, to disseminating knowledge in mass-printed books. Of course, it's also been useful for artists too, in creating fanciful works of art, whether they be complex, folded origami pieces or stunning paper-cuts.

Using recycled maps that have gone obsolete, London-based artist Claire Brewster takes these old papers and creates flocks of imagined birds by carving them out of the sheets' surface. The intricately incised forms play with silhouette, shadow and the existing colours on the maps, tying disparate shapes into one symphony of colour that seems to pop out of the wall and shift and move.

Claire Brewster© Claire Brewster
Claire Brewster© Claire Brewster
Claire Brewster© Claire Brewster

On individual birds, the vibrant hues of the maps become the unique markings of these paper fowl.

Claire Brewster© Claire Brewster
Claire Brewster© Claire Brewster
Claire Brewster© Claire Brewster
Claire Brewster© Claire Brewster

Brewster, who also works with metal and collage, turns to nature often as a universal source of inspiration:

Nature is ever present, even in the most urban environments, taking over wherever we neglect, living in a separate yet parallel universe. I take my inspiration from the natural environment, creating entomological installations of flora and fauna from imagined locations. My birds, insects and flowers transcend borders and pass freely between countries with scant regard for rules of immigration or the effects of biodiversity.

Claire Brewster© Claire Brewster
Claire Brewster© Claire Brewster
Claire Brewster© Claire Brewster

In another way too, Brewster's creative eye brings these lifeless, man-made two-dimensional representations of a natural landscape fluttering into life, reminding us that these places have their wild citizens too. We would do well to remember and respect them. More over at Claire Brewster.

[Via: My Modern Met]

Tags: Artists | Arts | Recycled Consumer Goods

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