Sculptor builds these healing mandalas with nature's bounty

Shona Wilson
© Shona Wilson

As children, we learn a lot through repetition, whether it's reciting our alphabet, tying our shoes or the hearing of age-old stories and myths, as they are being told again and again. For Australian sculptor Shona Wilson, who created these starkly beautiful mandala-like forms, repetition is a key to a deeper understanding of the mysteries of nature.

Though we might see these twigs, seeds and other bits of natural debris as random fragments of our world, Wilson sees something more profound:

The repetitive use of Nature's detritus brings me closer to understanding the world we share. The materials themselves are storehouses of knowledge and information. They act as 'keys', unlocking doors to memory, science, history and imagination... For the past 20 years my work has been an invitation to marvel and wonder at the details within nature which I have presented predominantly through sculptural assemblages.
Shona Wilson© Shona Wilson

Shona Wilson© Shona Wilson

Shona Wilson© Shona Wilson

It's an intriguing idea to perceive these bits of nature as "storehouses of information" -- when viewed with this perspective in mind, these complex assemblages become imbued with an evocative power. Wilson's latest series of works, titled Offerings, plays on that idea of that power within, which might then have the potential of being and doing more than they appear to be and do:

I hope these Offerings resonate as healing or therapeutic objects in their own right. They are embedded with the vibrational patterns and tones of the natural world, of the very materials they are made from, and thus they emit the frequencies of the materials within them.

Shona Wilson© Shona Wilson

Shona Wilson© Shona Wilson

Shona Wilson© Shona Wilson

To create these works, Wilson uses items that are collected from nature during her frequent walks, and which are then processed so that they begin to take a form that can be patterned repetitively. Wilson's intricate works draws inspiration from forms and patterns already found in nature, such as diatoms, they fractal forms of snowflakes, and from cymatics, the visual patterns of sound and vibration.

Shona Wilson© Shona Wilson

Shona Wilson© Shona Wilson

Shona Wilson© Shona Wilson

Wilson's aim is to make links between culture and nature -- the same patterns found in a snowflake could very well be found in the delicate web of handmade lace -- revealing a continuity and unity that might not be immediately apparent to our overly modern minds. Deceptively simple but hiding a complex layering of material and meaning, Wilson's organically formed artworks prompt us to look closer and to contemplate what underlies the world around us. To see more, visit Shona Wilson.

[Via: This Is Colossal]

Sculptor builds these healing mandalas with nature's bounty
Created using bits of twigs, seeds and other natural detritus, these intricate mandalas remind us of nature's power.

Related Content on Treehugger.com