Intensely layered papercuts highlight plight of endangered animals

Patrick Cabral
© Patrick Cabral

Papercut art has been around for hundreds of years, starting back in China during the Han dynasty. Many artists now practice the art, incorporating aspects of their cultures into their works. Based out of Manila, Philippines, multidisciplinary artist and art director Patrick Cabral presents a beautiful variation to the usual flat, two-dimensional standard, creating intricately layered papercuts in the form of endangered animals.

Patrick Cabral© Patrick Cabral

Patrick Cabral© Patrick Cabral

Patrick Cabral© Patrick Cabral

Seen over at This Is Colossal, Cabral's works feature dense carvings of curlicues and blooming motifs. It's a bit reminiscent of the style of ornamentation seen in Indonesian shadow puppets.

Patrick Cabral© Patrick Cabral

Patrick Cabral© Patrick Cabral

Patrick Cabral© Patrick Cabral

Patrick Cabral© Patrick Cabral

The features and fur of these majestic but threatened animals have been transformed into a visual feast of hand-cut embellishments, imparting a sense that we need to pay attention and look a bit closer. It also presents the fierceness of some of these wild creatures in a different, more fragile lens: "I want to provide a contrast of soft materials to a predator," says Cabral.

Patrick Cabral© Patrick Cabral

Patrick Cabral© Patrick Cabral

The series was conceived by Cabral as a way to highlight the plight of elephants, apes, tigers, pandas, lions, wolves and other animals that are currently being threatened by habitat loss, poaching, and other environmental pressures brought on by human greed, encroachment and massive climate change. All proceeds from the sale of Cabral's sculptures will be donated to the Philippines chapter of the World Wildlife Fund. To see more, visit Patrick Cabral's website and Instagram.

Intensely layered papercuts highlight plight of endangered animals
The art form of papercuts is taken to another level with these intricate works that draw attention to some of the world's threatened species.

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