Sculptor carves fallen redwood tree into ocean's largest tentacled creature

JMS Wood Sculpture
© JMS Wood Sculpture

Disease and strong winds (like those generated by a hurricane) can uproot and take down a tree. What to do with a tree once it's fallen? It could be salvaged and upcycled into furniture or any number of things; it could also be transformed into impressive art, as Washington-based woodcarver Jeffrey Michael Samudosky has done with this enormous, tentacled creature, carved out of a fallen redwood tree.

JMS Wood Sculpture© JMS Wood Sculpture
JMS Wood Sculpture© JMS Wood Sculpture
JMS Wood Sculpture© JMS Wood Sculpture

Samudosky uses a variety of techniques to create his stunning animal forms, the primary one being a chainsaw. He uses these tools to shape the wood into different flowing figures found in nature.

Samudosky is a self-taught artist who discovered his passion for woodcarving after a life-threatening snowboarding accident which left him with a broken back and almost paralyzed from the waist down. After months of painful recovery, he got back into snowboarding. One day while passing through Vermont, caught a glimpse of some wood carvings at the side of road and thought that that was something he could do too, leading him to start his company, JMS Wood Sculpture, back in 1998.

JMS Wood Sculpture© JMS Wood Sculpture
JMS Wood Sculpture© JMS Wood Sculpture
JMS Wood Sculpture© JMS Wood Sculpture
JMS Wood Sculpture© JMS Wood Sculpture
JMS Wood Sculpture© JMS Wood Sculpture

Samudosky has since carved plenty of sculptures for a variety of clients as well as for private sale. His latest work is this cephalopod, specifically Enteroctopus dofleini, or Giant Pacific Octopus, which according to Wikipedia:

It can be found from the intertidal zone down to 2,000 m (6,600 ft), and is best adapted to cold, oxygen-rich water. It is arguably the largest octopus species, based on a scientific record of a 71-kg (156-lb) individual weighed live.

It's amazing how Samudosky was able to "find the form" within the mass of tangled redwood matter, but the result is absolutely beautiful and shows that even fallen trees can find new life. To see more of Samudosky, visit JMS Wood Sculpture.

Tags: Artists | Arts | Trees

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