Artist's eye-popping 3D murals make buildings look like they're dissolving (Video)

Peeta
© Peeta

We take the solidity of walls as a given: they look solid, therefore they should be solid. However, Italian artist Peeta (a.k.a. Manuel de Rita) makes a point of challenging this assumption with his extraordinary murals, which use vibrant, three-dimensional elements to give the illusion that the building they are painted in is in a state of transformational flux. Watch him explain his artistic philosophy:

Peeta© Peeta

Peeta's path as an artist has evolved over the years. He initially was doing more conventional, graffiti-inspired stuff, but that's changed with these huge, new works that seem to take over the urban landscape, and over the viewer's senses:

Initially, my works only realized the sculptural quality of individual letters, namely the ones that spelled out my own moniker Peeta. Progressively, the fusion between traditional lettering and three dimensional style has given life to a unique kind of visual rhythm. Today, through my anamorphic works I redesign the volumes of any kind of surface involved, thus causing with my paintings a temporary interruption of normality by altering the perception of familiar contexts, and so raising a different understanding of spaces and, consequently, of reality as a whole.

Peeta© Peeta

Peeta© Peeta

Peeta© Peeta

Peeta's execution of these murals is quite impressive: the shading, the painting of three-dimensional forms over strategic spots (like over windows) make them look like they are floating (when they are actually not). In other cases, he manages to make it look like there are no walls at all -- it's amazing to think that these start out as flat, two-dimensional surfaces.

Peeta© Peeta

Peeta© Peeta

Peeta© Peeta

Peeta© Peeta

Peeta© Peeta

So far, Peeta's works have transformed walls into eye-popping masterpieces all over the world, from China, to Spain and Italy. Besides creating mind-boggling murals, Peeta also paints canvases and creates sculptures, and you can see them over on his website.

[Via: Cross Connect Magazine]

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