Huge food company to eliminate food waste, halve plastic use

pig in a field photo
© Cranswick

It's getting really hard to keep up with all the commitments on plastic. Could food waste be next?

Obviously, cutting food waste is both a moral and environmental imperative. Still, when I read Paul Hawken's Drawdown, I was surprised to see reducing food waste listed as the #3 solution to climate change, right after greener refrigerants and scaled up wind energy. Yet it continues to get considerably less attention than renewable energy or fancy electric trucks.

Things, however, might be changing. And just like the recent flurry of corporate commitments on single use plastics, we're beginning to see similar efforts to cut back on wasted food too. The latest comes from Cranswick, one of the largest food companies in the UK and a specialist in fresh, frozen and deli meats as well as pastry products. According to Business Green, the company is promising to become a "zero food waste" company by 2030 at the latest.

But that's not all. As part of a plan that Cranswick is calling 'Second Nature', the company is also promising to purchase 100% renewable energy starting next month, to halve its plastic use by 2025, and also to achieve 100% recyclable packaging by the same date. This is good stuff, and builds on energy efficiency efforts which have already seen a 20% reduction in energy consumption per tonne of product manufactured since 2008.

Specifically, it's worth noting, a plan like this will have an out-sized impact because much of Cranswick's products are meat- or animal-products based. And as Derek previously noted, meat waste is the worst waste because its production is so much more energy and resource intensive in the first place.

Now, I wonder if Cranswick is also down with efforts to promote more plant-centered diets too. They wouldn't be the first meat-centric company to start looking at that possibility.

Huge food company to eliminate food waste, halve plastic use
It's getting really hard to keep up with all the commitments on plastic. Could food waste be next?

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