Ford begins production on StreetScooter WORK XL electric delivery trucks

Ford StreetScooter WORK XL electric truck photo
© Ford Media Center

The partnership with DHL for zero emissions vehicles could have a significant impact on freight transport.

Given the sheer size of logistics company DHL, it was encouraging when they announced that they were going to start using electric trucks. What was even more encouraging, however, was the fact that they promised to start producing and selling them.

Now Electrek reports that production has started on a much awaited partnership between DHL and Ford. Produced in Germany, and dubbed the StreetScooter WORK XL, the new truck has a load volume capacity of 20 cubic meters, and can apparently carry around 200 parcels. The factory in Cologne will apparently churning out 3,500 such trucks a year which—while not exactly earth shattering when compared to electric passenger car production numbers—should serve to put a pretty big dent in oil demand, thanks to the miserable fuel consumption of most diesel trucks and the fact that these things spend a lot more time on the road than your average family run around.

It's worth noting, of course, that this is just the latest in a long line of recent announcements about electrification of freight. Ikea, for example, is planning a 100% zero emission delivery fleet by 2025. Meanwhile a consortium of 16 of the largest van fleets in the UK is planning large-scale electrification. And then, of course, there's the Tesla Semi.

All of this is very encouraging. While I fully understand why folks wish government and business would promote bikes, e-bikes and pedestrianization over electric cars, I have a harder time envisioning a world where we no longer need to move stuff around by truck. (Yes, OK, trains should be used more too.) When big players like Ford and DHL team up, I think it could have a major impact on the industry overall.

Ford begins production on StreetScooter WORK XL electric delivery trucks
The partnership with DHL for zero emissions vehicles could have a significant impact on freight transport.

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