10 Bedroom Plants to Improve Your Sleep

A snake plant sits next to a bed with white sheets

Feel Pic / Getty Images

When it comes to health, few things are as important as a good night’s sleep. And while there are many remedies that aim to address poor sleep, not all of them are naturally derived. Luckily, a variety of common houseplants contain beneficial properties to improve your sleep quality. Whether it purifies the air like areca palm or reduces anxiety like passionflower, consider finding a healthy night’s rest with the help from a plant.

Here are 10 bedroom plants to improve your sleep.

Warning

Some of the plants on this list are toxic to pets. For more information about the safety of specific plants, consult the ASPCA's searchable database.

1
of 10

Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

Potted lavender in silver bucket on tiled floor

anskuw / Getty Images

A 2015 study in the Journal of Alternative Medicine and Complementary Medicine found that participants who used lavender essential oil before bed experienced improved sleep quality compared to the control group. If you choose to keep a lavender plant in your bedroom, be sure to prune it to shape each spring after new leaves appear. Lavender’s sweet fragrance is another good reason to consider keeping a pot of the purple herb in your bedroom.

Plant Care Tips

  • Light: Full sun.
  • Water: Dry to medium.
  • Soil: Light, sandy, and well-drained.
  • Pet Safety: Toxic to cats and dogs.
2
of 10

Gardenia (Gardenia jasminoides)

beautiful white flower gardenia on green background

Solstizia/Getty Images

Gardenias, also referred to as cape jasmine, are a strongly aromatic evergreen shrub with properties known to help increase the quality of sleep. A study published by the National Library of Medicine showed that crocetin, a compound in gardenias, helped reduce the amount of “wakening episodes” experienced by sleepers. When watering gardenias, use drip irrigation to avoid leaf spots. If you are a new gardener, consider trying gardenia essential oils, as the plant requires high maintenance.

Plant Care Tips

  • Light: Part shade.
  • Water: Medium.
  • Soil: Acidic, humus-rich, and well-drained.
  • Pet Safety: Toxic to cats and dogs.
3
of 10

Areca Palm (Dypsis lutescens)

Areca palm in green pot on shaggy stool in living room

Treehugger / Sanja Kostic

One of the most popular indoor plants, the areca palm features multiple stems that somewhat resemble bamboo and has a knack for purifying the air. Researchers at Pukyong National University found that the areca palm, among other plants, helped reduce C02 concentrations in the surrounding environment. As anyone with springtime allergies can attest, clean air and good sleep go hand in hand. Keep your areca palm in a room with high humidity for best results.

Plant Care Tips

  • Light: Full sun to part shade.
  • Water: Medium.
  • Soil: Rich, moist, and well-drained.
  • Pet Safety: Nontoxic to cats and dogs.
4
of 10

Snake Plant (Sansevieria trifasciata)

The dark green leaves of a snake plant jut upward from a gray pot sitting on a mantle

Noyo Plantes / Unsplash

The snake plant, or as it is menacingly referred to, viper’s bowstring hemp, is among a group of plants known for their remarkable ability to remove indoor air pollutants. In a famous NASA study, scientists discovered that snake plants were adept at turning toxicants into clean air. To ensure the good health of your snake plant, water regularly throughout the growing season and reduce from the fall through late winter. Disregard the threatening name and consider keeping a low-maintenance snake plant by your bedside.

Plant Care Tips

  • Light: Part shade.
  • Water: Medium.
  • Soil: Well-drained potting mix.
  • Pet Safety: Toxic to cats and dogs.
5
of 10

English Ivy (Hedera helix)

English ivy plant on windowsill next to a bowl of fruit and lantern

Aliyev Alexei Sergeevich / Getty Images

A study published in Phytomedicine found that English ivy extracts correlated with an “improvement of respiratory functions” in children with asthma. Consider keeping an English ivy plant in a pot on a window sill or above a bedroom window in a hanging basket. English ivy is easily propagated by stem cuttings in spring and early summer, making for a thoughtful gift for friends.

Plant Care Tips

  • Light: Part shade to full shade.
  • Water: Medium.
  • Soil: Rich, moist, and well-drained.
  • Pet Safety: Toxic to cats and dogs.
6
of 10

Purple Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata)

Lavender petals spread open with dark purple pistons shooting up, crown-like

tdlucas5000 / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

A native to the Southeastern United States, the purple passionflower has been shown to have anxiety-reducing effects that could be beneficial in establishing healthy sleeping patterns. A clinical trial found that extract from the flower, along with oxazepam, helped patients manage their anxiety. Their intricate flower structure features a stunning crown of purple filaments. Purple passionflowers also produce an edible, egg-shaped fruit called maypops.

Plant Care Tips

  • Light: Full sun to part shade.
  • Water: Medium.
  • Soil: Moderately fertile and well-drained.
  • Pet Safety: Nontoxic to cats and dogs.
7
of 10

Garden Heliotrope (Valeriana officinalis)

Closeup of a cluster of small, pale-pink flowers against a blurred, green background

Michael Pierce / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Derived from the Latin word for health, the garden heliotrope, or valerian, has long been associated with medicinal qualities. In fact, in a study published in Chemical Senses, researchers linked the inhalation of garden heliotrope extract to the “enhancement of sleep.” Extracts from the plant are often used in herbal teas and perfumes. The garden heliotrope can tolerate some shade, but performs best when provided with full sunlight.

Plant Care Tips

  • Light: Full sun.
  • Water: Medium to wet.
  • Soil: Moist, rich loams.
  • Pet Safety: Nontoxic to cats and dogs.
8
of 10

Chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile)

Dozens of small chamomile flowers with a puffy, yellow center and small white petals face towards the sun

Leora Knight / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

An herb of many uses, chamomile has been applied for a variety of ailments ranging from muscle spasms and ulcers to inflammation and insomnia. A review in Molecular Medicine Reports discusses the sedative effects of chamomile extract whether consumed through ingestion as a tea or inhaled via aromatherapy. Leave a pot of chamomile growing on the bedroom windowsill for the added benefit of its sweet, applelike scent. To make your own chamomile tea, remove flower heads and allow them to dry.

Plant Care Tips

  • Light: Full sun to part shade.
  • Water: Medium.
  • Soil: Sandy and well-drained.
  • Pet Safety: Toxic to cats and dogs.
9
of 10

Golden Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)

A golden pothos spills out of a hanging pot in a white room

Brendan Maher / Getty Images

A native of the Solomon Islands, golden pothos has shown to be an effective remover of air pollutants like formaldehyde and benzyne, among others, thus making it an ideal plant for improving sleeping conditions. Plant this climbing ivy in a ceramic pot or hanging basket near windows with partial sunlight. Keep golden pothos away from pets, as it is poisonous.

Plant Care Tips

  • Light: Part shade.
  • Water: Medium.
  • Soil: Moist, peaty potting mix.
  • Pet Safety: Toxic to cats and dogs.
10
of 10

Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum)

Peace lily on a table

Grumpy Cow Studios | Getty Images

Peace lilies aren’t just impressive to look at, they can purify the air in your bedroom, too. In a large study conducted by researchers at NASA, these perennial evergreens were observed removing several varieties of toxicants from enclosed environments. Peace lilies prefer bright, filtered light, so place in front of a south-facing window if possible. Be sure to plant peace lilies in large pots for proper root growth.

Plant Care Tips

  • Light: Part shade to full shade.
  • Water: Medium.
  • Soil: Evenly moist, but not soggy.
  • Pet Safety: Toxic to cats and dogs.