Easing Hong Kong's housing crisis with bamboo micro-dwellings in vacant factories

AFFECT-T
© AFFECT-T

The fallout of Hong Kong's housing crisis has hit the media before with images of so-called cubicle and cage apartments, where residents who cannot afford the island's rising rents and real estate prices must live. The numbers are dire, with over 280,000 citizens who lack a permanent place to call home.

© AFFECT-T

Hong Kong-based design studio AFFECT-T are proposing using bamboo and rattan micro-dwellings situated in abandoned Hong Kong factories as a temporary solution to the growing problem. With these fast-growing and relatively cheap materials, the idea is to create better conditions and better access to infrastructure inside already vacant industrial properties for these already existing "informal" communities -- not just for Hong Kong but for other Asian cities too.

© AFFECT-T
© AFFECT-T
© AFFECT-T

The designers say that the micro-dwelling will have a living area, kitchenette, bathroom, fold-out dining table, workspace and bedroom:

The walls vary in pattern to provide more privacy or ventilation as needed and feature curved rattan pieces linking the walls and ceiling and providing and sense of depth and connection between spaces in the small dwelling.

The house was created in the belief that small-scale affordable housing need not be poor quality housing. Using local materials a modular system was developed which can meet the needs of the many without housing while costing little to construct in time and money.

© AFFECT-T
© AFFECT-T

The built-in flexibility behind the design allows for ease of re-configuration as occupancy changes, but the infrastructure provided by these huge buildings won't go unused:

Homes will be serviced through a singular backbone providing water and electricity to individual units and disposing of waste, while cooling, heating, structure, and enclosure are provided.

© AFFECT-T
© AFFECT-T

It's an intriguing idea that would connect vacant city spaces with those who are truly in need of a transitional home before finding affordable housing. More over at AFFECT-T.

Tags: Hong Kong | Housing Industry | Small Spaces

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