Skinny transformer wall expands this 300 sq. ft. apartment

Brad Swartz
© Brad Swartz

Many young people are choosing to eschew the big suburban house with a backyard, choosing to live in urban apartments instead, near all the urban amenities that only the city can offer. Rising rents has meant that one may get less space for the buck, but it hasn't deterred people from using creative measures to enlarge a small space.

Using sliding doors to hide clutter and divide up a small space, Australian architect Brad Swartz designed this space-maximizing intervention for a couple living in less than 300 square feet, in Darlington, New South Wales.

Brad Swartz© Brad Swartz

Working with a tight budget and tight space, Swartz manages to squeeze in lots of storage by adding this full wall of storage, which also functions to split up a homogenous space into different functions. He explains on ArchDaily:

Whilst this apartment was initially one room, the concept was to re-instate a public and private divide to define two distinct zones: A public living, dining, and kitchen space was formed by relocating the kitchen to create open plan living. A minimalist design approach was then taken to the interior design of the room to maximise the feeling of space and light.

This 17-inch thick transformer wall hides a slide-out desk, a generous wine cabinet, and places to put books and other belongings. Off to the left, is a sliding door leading to the bathroom.

Brad Swartz© Brad Swartz
Brad Swartz© Brad Swartz
Brad Swartz© Brad Swartz

Swartz even chose skinnier floorboards to give the illusion of greater width.

Brad Swartz© Brad Swartz

The kitchen features a mirror backsplash to increase the feeling of spaciousness and light.

Brad Swartz© Brad Swartz

From the living room, one enters the bedroom is behind one sliding door. The bedroom floor is lofted up to create underfloor storage, while the bed itself takes up the whole room, and storage is relegated to cabinets on the wall.

Brad Swartz© Brad Swartz
Brad Swartz© Brad Swartz

By compressing storage into one full-wall element, it hides any clutter that may make the space feel cramped. Small but important details like mirrors and special flooring give the small square footage the appearance of openness and lightness -- all great ideas that could be brought into any tiny space. More over at ArchDaily and Brad Swartz.

Tags: Architecture | Australia | Less Is More | Small Spaces

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