Minimalist tiny house is a family vacation getaway on wheels

Deyan Tomov
© Deyan Tomov

Getting back to nature for most harried city dwellers means making a conscious effort to make plans to go camping out somewhere far, far away from the city. For some, it means roughing it out in a tent, but this can be difficult if you've got young children in tow. Bulgarian designer Hristina Hristova created this lovely, tiny getaway on wheels as a more comfortable alternative to a tent and tourist traps, and as a cheaper option than buying a recreational vehicle or a piece of country land.

Deyan Tomov© Deyan Tomov

On Dornob, she says that's it about keeping a low profile:

Our limited budget as a young family kept the idea of buying a plot and building on it distant and impossible. And by doing so we were just going to be part of the concrete army invading the seaside. So we opted for making our retreat on wheels. Under the canopy we spend long afternoons drinking chilled wine.

Deyan Tomov© Deyan Tomov

A number of features play directly into local customs of rest and relaxation, and are a measured response to the fallacy of "bigger is better," says Hristova:

[The] Bulgarian traditions demand often our afternoon wine turned into long dinners with sea food and light music. That’s why we added accent exterior lighting as well as white panes to better reflect the light. Koleliba as we called this tiny vacation house (koleliba – a made up word meaning a hut on wheels) is our response to the invading consumerism that encourages us to always want our homes bigger, better and unnecessarily luxurious.

Deyan Tomov© Deyan Tomov

Built on top of a trailer base and built out of pine and birch plywood, and insulated with rockwool, the 96-square-foot Koleliba measures 7.5 by 22 feet, and is about 8 feet tall. The small space is enlarged by the minimalist aesthetic, exemplified by the large glazed door and window, but there's plenty of storage to keep clutter out of sight, and a fold-out couch-bed that tucks away to make more space when not in use. The kitchen features a sink, refrigerator, oven and a generous amount of counter space. No word on what the bathroom and toilet set-up is, but it appears to be tucked behind the kitchen area.

Deyan Tomov© Deyan Tomov
Deyan Tomov© Deyan Tomov
Deyan Tomov© Deyan Tomov
Deyan Tomov© Deyan Tomov

The outdoor bench (it's removable) and awning is a main attraction, designed to provide lots of optimal seating for relaxing out of doors, putting down your drink, and thus enlarging the available space for both family and guests to hang out in.

Deyan Tomov© Deyan Tomov

Granted, it's not as light as a tent, but structures like these can also have more uses: some are used to bring in extra rental income, or as so-called "granny sheds" (try doing that with a tent!). With more people opting for smaller, alternative ways of living -- and relaxing -- this lovely little home away from home shows that 'small' can be simple, original and ultimately, functional. See more over at Hristina Hristova.

Tags: Camping | European Union | Less Is More | Living With Less | Small Spaces

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