Couple builds luminous 192 sq. ft. tiny house for extra rental income

Patrick & Sarah Romero
© Patrick & Sarah Romero

One of the tricks to make a tiny space seem larger is to flood it with as much natural light as possible. While skylights might be a pain to install properly and could potentially be less energy-efficient, they do illuminate darkened interiors well. Patrick and Sarah Romero of Sandy, Utah, created this luminous tiny home that's accented with three large pyramid-shaped skylights.

Patrick & Sarah Romero© Patrick & Sarah Romero

According to Tiny House Talk, the couple work as videographers and built the tiny house over three months, with the help of Sarah's father, during the summer of 2014. The couple say that their intention was to generate extra income by renting the tiny house out, and making it attractive to potential tenants by using a clean aesthetic:

We wanted something really clean and fresh looking, almost beach-like. We loved the idea of all white with pops of accenting colors in the decor.

Patrick & Sarah Romero© Patrick & Sarah Romero

Inside, the home features an interesting layout: it has two doors, and somewhat of a L-shaped kitchenette that's been split up into a prep space and a sink/stove area.

Patrick & Sarah Romero© Patrick & Sarah Romero

The dining counter can fold down, to create more space in the sitting area. The sofa can also fold out to double as an extra sleeping space for guests. There are also some quirky storage/seating alcoves in one wall here, flanking the door.

Patrick & Sarah Romero© Patrick & Sarah Romero
Patrick & Sarah Romero© Patrick & Sarah Romero

Situated under the loft, the bathroom is ginormous by tiny house standards, with enough space to swing a wet cat (figuratively speaking of course).

Patrick & Sarah Romero© Patrick & Sarah Romero
Patrick & Sarah Romero© Patrick & Sarah Romero
Patrick & Sarah Romero© Patrick & Sarah Romero

The sleeping space above is gorgeous, with the skylights providing an open view of the sky above -- probably great for stargazing.

Patrick & Sarah Romero© Patrick & Sarah Romero
Patrick & Sarah Romero© Patrick & Sarah Romero

The 192-square-foot dwelling is built primarily out of recycled materials and secondhand appliances, allowing them to keep building costs toward the low end of around USD $25,000.

Patrick & Sarah Romero© Patrick & Sarah Romero

As many tiny housers are aware, local bylaws regarding tiny homes can be a headache. Unfortunately, the Romeros had their share of troubles with officials when it was discovered they had this accessory dwelling in their ideal location, resulting in them having to move it:

We were shut down by the county, and after months of fighting them, trying to find loopholes, they gave us a cease and desist notice, so we had to move the tiny home to an RV park to continue renting it out legally.

Patrick & Sarah Romero© Patrick & Sarah Romero

Following their experience, the Romeros stress that it's important to thoroughly research local regulations, as not every town can be as progressive as others in legalizing these small homes. The Romeros have built a gorgeous home that demonstrate the another side of the "economic freedom" coin that tiny houses can offer: you can save money by living in one, or earn extra cash by renting it out. More over at Tiny House Talk and Tiffany Blue Eyes.

Tags: Less Is More | Living With Less | Small Spaces | Utah

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