Fogponic Unit Stacks Vertically to Grow More Veggies in Less Space

© Vakant Design

Growing food indoors is usually limited by the space you have. More often than not, that means some kind of vertical placement, as we've seen with windowfarms, mini-greenhouses doubling as lighting and aeroponic systems.

Fogponics -- a more advanced application of aeroponics where vaporized water is used to transfer nutrients and oxygen to enclosed, suspended plant roots -- is where German design company Vakant Design begins instead with Fogger, a unit designed to give plants that extra boost.

© Vakant Design

Fogger works by inserting pre-germinated vegetable seedlings into neoprene plugs, which are in turn placed into the stackable unit. Water and organic fertilizer is poured into the tank which then delivers water and nutrients via an ultrasonic mister.

© Vakant Design

The vertical design occupies only 0.3 square meters of space, but can produce up to the same amount as a 3 meters square garden, using 4 watts (though they don't say at what rate). Say the designers:

Up to six weeks the plants are self-sufficiently supplied with water and nourishment via a fogponic cultivation technique: Generated by an ultrasonic head the nutrient-rich fog flows around the roots that grow in the inside of the pillar. This way, a maximum oxygen supply is provided and the plants full growth potential is released.

© Vakant Design
© Vakant Design

With design ideas like this, lack of soil is no longer a barrier to growing your own food at home. Check out more details over at Vakant Design; do-it-yourselfers can also watch this video here to see a self-build version.

Tags: Gardening

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