Beautifully patterned ceramics are 3D printed with sound vibrations (video)

Solid Vibrations
© Solid Vibrations

From prosthetics, to architecture and to how things are designed and distributed, additive manufacturing is disrupting how things are conventionally done. Designers are having plenty of fun with the technology too, with some creating "hand-printed" ceramics and affordable mud housing out of custom 3D printers.

Seen over at Design Milk, Olivier van Herpt and Studio Van Broekhoven explored the combination of 3D printing technology with sound-based designs. Using a customized ceramics printer setup, with a speaker rig mounted below the printing platform, low thumping vibrations constantly emanate, manipulating each layered output and to re-shape the final form according to these vibrations. See a video of this intriguing process:


Solid Vibration from StudioVanBroekhoven on Vimeo.

Solid Vibrations© Solid Vibrations
Solid Vibrations© Solid Vibrations
Solid Vibrations© Solid Vibrations

Sound designer Ricky Van Broekhoven calls it "spatially solidifying audio as it creates marvelous patterns." Olivier van Herpt explains that the process "lets noisescapes become things. A moment in time, a song a sound, they can now become objects that encapsulate the moment forever. Vibrations turned into shapes by the 3D printer."

Solid Vibrations© Solid Vibrations
Solid Vibrations© Solid Vibrations

The process originally began when van Herpt noticed that the ceramic 3D printing process is inherently imperfect, leaving interesting moiré patterns in the product. Teaming up with Van Broekhoven's interest in sound design, the pair combined their skills to create objects that have been literally shaped by sound.

Solid Vibrations© Solid Vibrations
Solid Vibrations© Solid Vibrations

This innovative process seems to draw upon a few interesting concepts, most notably that of cymatics, which studies the visible outputs of sound. Visually intricate, but arising from the principle of letting imperfections be, these one-of-a-kind ceramic works represent well how a new technology can be used to explore old concepts. Read more over at Design Milk, Olivier van Herpt and Studio Van Broekhoven.

Tags: Accessories | Downloadable Design | Music

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