Simple But Luxurious: Ceramics Molded From Real Avocados by C4

Designboom/via

Ah, delicious avocado. Journeying through meat-heavy Mexico as a vegetarian some years ago, this amazing fatty fruit was a daily staple for me. And with the intention of re-defining the idea of "luxury" using the rich expression of natural materials and methods, it seems like the Austrian-Mexican collab design pair at C4 have got it right with their collection of ceramics that are directly molded from different varieties of avocado.

Austrian creative director Christiane Büssgen and Mexican designer Jesús Alonso combine forces to celebrate the role that the avocado plays in Mexican culture, transposing this into accessories that evoke a sense of luxury and desirability:

In pre-Hispanic history - and still today - the Avocado is the fruit of desire; it‘s shape referred to testicles (Ahuacatl from Nahuatl) was forbidden for young people to even touch. Also compared with the shape of a pear (Alligator pear), in fact the curve of the outer line is very feminine. This association melts with the pleasure of eating.

We'll remember that with the next bite of avocado we'll eat. Designboom describes how the "Avolution" ceramics are made from real avocados:

A two-part mold, originally cast from a real avocado half, is filled with liquid porcelain and left with the top off for 15 minutes. at this point, all remaining liquid is drained, leaving a shell-like form. After letting the piece dry for 40 minutes, the designers remove the top stratum of the mold and cut away the additional material along the piece's top, molding the edges as they remove the avocado from the mold.

Each piece is glazed by hand in brown, white, or a specialty colour glaze, and fired for 14 hours.

Designboom/via

Really a beautiful marriage of craft, nature and simplified luxury, and something we definitely hope to see more of, design-wise. To see the rest of the process photos, visit Designboom, and check out more of C4's projects on their website.

Tags: Accessories | Designers | Mexico

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