Insect Sushi and Copper Recycling Machines at the Royal College of Art Graduate Show

Bonnie Alter/CC BY 2.0

The annual summer show for graduate students at the Royal College of Art in London is a chance to see what the brightest and best students in their fields are thinking about. The Innovation Design Engineering students are the super stars with projects that are innovative and socially responsible.

Take insect sushi. Edible insects are a healthy, tasty and sustainable source of protein but there are strong cultural taboos. Ento Sushi is a project that shows how to introduce these edible insects to the Western diet gradually through a succession of foods and eating experiences. No free samples offered.

Bonnie Alter/CC BY 2.0

Farmers in developing countries lose food harvested in the fields because they can't keep it cool: they don't have cold storage on the field, or in transport. Shockingly, more than 40% of the food losses occur at post-harvest and processing stages of the food supply chain. This evaporative cooling project, Sunfresh, is a carrier, made out of recycled textiles and plastics. Aimed at rural Indian farmers, the materials are all local to that country and use discarded textiles, excess beeswax and plastic waste.

Bonnie Alter/CC BY 2.0

Ghana has the largest amount of toxic copper wire waste in the world. This machine, which fits on the back of a bicycle, provides an alternative to unhealthy wire burning by recovering the copper mechanically. The machine is built by local townspeople. It fits on a bicycle because they are the most common method of transportation there.

Bonnie Alter/CC BY 2.0

The portable, pop-up "factory" will enable youth to make skate boards. Intended as a way to teach young people life skills, the boards are made using a portable set of tooling and with the help and support of a mentor.

Bonnie Alter/CC BY 2.0

The insulating blocks are made out of crushed sea shells in Ensanada Mexico. In winter temperatures can dip to 10°C inside houses which have no central heating. These blocks are made of shells and grape stalks: both of which are plentiful. They can be easily installed and provide employment opportunities for young people.

Tags: Designers | Exhibits | London

WHAT'S HOT ON FACEBOOK