Sliced sculptural lamps enhance the raw beauty of reclaimed wood

Split Grain
© Split Grain

Sometimes, it seems like we take wood for granted. We often think of it as something to burn for heat, or something to process into building materials, rather than appreciating it for its raw, inherent beauty.

Going against this grain (pun intended) is designer and maker Paul Foeckler of California's Split Grain, who creates these striking, sculptural lamps using ordinary pieces of reclaimed wood that have been repetitively cross-sectioned and meticulously rearranged on metal posts to enhance their intricate, natural detailing.

Split Grain© Split Grain
Split Grain© Split Grain
Split Grain© Split Grain

Foeckler's journey as the creator of these minimalist lighting pieces began in 2012, when he happened to have an epiphany while chopping firewood:

The project began with me taking notice of an ordinary piece of firewood and thinking it too beautiful to burn. The exterior texture and shape had such organic appeal that I started experimenting. I found that different splitting techniques followed by sawing the form into slices enhanced the cross sections and revealed even more incredible formations and imperceptible grain patterns. The repetition of slices heightened those qualities even more and the addition of light from within unlocked beautiful intricacies across the grain itself.

Split Grain© Split Grain
Split Grain© Split Grain

Foeckler forages for wood locally, using branches and other detritus taken from fallen or damaged trees, including species like California Coastal Monterey Cypress and Ash.

Chosen pieces of wood are split and sectioned. The lamps are illuminated by inserting a low-voltage, energy-efficient LED light into a hollowed-out core of the wooden slices. Aluminum is integrated as a handy heat sink, while also adding to the pieces' micro-scaled architectural flair. The piece is sanded carefully and a protective coat of clear urethane is applied. It's a process that takes Foeckler sometimes up to 100 hours per piece to complete.

Split Grain© Split Grain
Split Grain© Split Grain

The result is something that looks a world apart from mass-produced stuff, which is the point, says Foeckler:

The final works are minimalist and formal with a strong architectural sensibility which I think poetically speaks to the noble trees they came from.

See more of Paul Foeckler's work on Split Grain and Etsy.

Split Grain© Split Grain

[Via: My Modern Met]

Tags: California | Lighting | Recycled Building Materials

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