Pellet Stoves Are Still Hot

Based on our stats, it is clear that TreeHugger readers still want to have a green sex life in a shipping container home warmed by a pellet stove. As fall approaches, it's time to look at the subject again. TreeHugger and Planet Green have covered many pellet stoves before, and for the most part they are pig ugly, retro 19th century designs that no self-respecting modernist would have in their home. It doesn't have to be this way.

The little unit shown above is a Wodtke TopLine pellet stove with an integrated hot water heater, capable of storing 50Kg of pellets. Of course, these European babies aren't cheap; the Topline starts at 7,700 € and tops out at 9,000 €. More information on Appliancist and in German at Wodtke.

They also make this lovely stove, described on Appliancist:

The most modernly shaped out of all Wodtke pellet stoves, it comes with integrated water heat exchanger for connection to the central heating, offering a nominal 10 kW output with settings between 2 kW and 10 kW. Its storage box allows you to stockpile some 52 kg of wood pellets.


Aga, known for its fashionable but energy hogging cookers (ranges to North Americans), makes this more modest stove with a 13 kW output. Given their reputation, it is surprising to read:

The AGA Fusion Pellet Stove efficiently, conveniently and cheaply converts biomass in the form of Wood Pellet Fuel to heat while giving off almost no wood smoke, helping to protect the environment. Wood Pellets are a renewable, clean-burning biomass product made from renewable substances, such as recycled waste wood or short rotation coppice wood.

All for a modest £2,160. More at Aga, found at Appliancist

When we wrote about the Panorama from MCZ in Gorgeous Pellet Stoves (Of Course, They're Italian) we asked "why stunners like these Italian jobs from MCZ are not available in North America."

It is probably first an issue of price; grandma-style stoves like the one above, that Mike showed in his post Thinking of Buying a Pellet Stove? We Can Help! cost under three thousand dollars and most people are buying these things to save money, not spend it on high design.

In his terrific Buy Green: Pellet Stoves piece on Planet Green, Brian found this Englander by England Stove Works, even cheaper at $ 1650.

Simple and compact, the Englander is one of the top selling pellet stoves in the U.S.--it's also one of the cheapest. Despite the budget-friendly price, this stove maintains many of the features touted by its pricier competitors, such as a consistent double auger feed system, auto-ignite, and an adjustable feed rate and blower speed.

It doesn't have to be this way.

Tags: Italy | Japan

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