Nomadic Resorts' self-sufficient living pod packs luxuries

© Nomadic Resorts

There's a certain mystique in the thought of living in nature away from all the urban hustle and bustle in a beautiful nomad's tent. Admittedly, it's a bit idealistic and escapist, but nevertheless, it's always neat to see the many modern re-interpretations of traditional nomadic homes like the Mongolian yurt, and even more fascinating to see completely new concepts like this caterpillar-shaped prefab tent from Nomadic Resorts.

© Nomadic Resorts

Inspired by natural processes, patterns and systems, the Looper is mobile, luxury "self-sufficient living pod" of tensile fabric stretched over a sustainably-sourced wooden frame. Say the designers, who come from a variety of disciplines ranging from architecture to permaculture to structural engineering:

The orthogonal structure uses a small volume of structural material to enclose a large internal volume in translucent fabric. The recycleable membrane flysheet lasts for decades, withstands the harshest environmental conditions, emits no volatile organic compounds and glows like a firefly at night.

© Nomadic Resorts

The pod measures 10 metres long by 4 metres wide and is designed to have as light of a footprint as possible, while still making it ideal for "luxury" locations like high-end eco-resorts, yoga retreats and beaches.

© Nomadic Resorts
© Nomadic Resorts

There are solar panels powering LED lighting, a fully functioning bathroom with wastewater treatment, a changing room, a sleeping area with air-conditioning (we wonder if this really has to be necessary though!), a small office with Wifi, and an indoor/outdoor lounge complete with entertainment system. It's got a lot of volume in there at 3 metres tall, and the retractable roof is a nice touch, letting the outdoors directly in.

© Nomadic Resorts

High-tech add-ons aside, this prefab abode is a luxurious but light-footed concept that would be interesting to see further developed. More over at Nomadic Resorts.

Tags: Architecture

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