New York City's Dragonfly A Locavore Wet Dream

Photo courtesy of: Vincent Callebaut Architectures

Architect Vincent Callebaut will have locavores drooling if his 128-floor vertical farm concept is actually realized.

The Dubai-esque Dragonfly addresses issues like food production and agriculture in cities that are horizontally-challenged for space like New York City. The concept supports housing, offices, laboratories and twenty-eight different agricultural fields. Photo courtesy of: Vincent Callebaut Architectures

Set at the Southern bank of New York's Roosevelt Island, the Belgium-designed Dragonfly consists of two towers and is completely Hobbit free. It's a 2,000 foot tall structure that harnesses both solar and wind power. In fact, it's completely self-sufficient!

Photo courtesy of: Vincent Callebaut Architectures

The exterior gardens are used for capturing and filtering rain water. Using the water, and domestic liquid waste, the water is recirculated and used for irrigation.

The greenhouse, which gives the structure its wing-like design, supports the load of the building and is inspired by the structural exoskeleton of dragonfly wings.

Photo courtesy of: Vincent Callebaut Architectures
Photo courtesy of: Vincent Callebaut Architectures

Source: World Architecture News
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Tags: Agriculture | Architecture | Food Miles | Local Food