Living a Life Without Plastic Is Possible, but Expensive

Crowded booth at Life WIthout Plastic Lloyd Alter/CC BY 2.0

We do go on about the dangers of certain plastics, from the Bisphenol A in polycarbonates to the phthalates in vinyl and PVC. One often doesn't have a whole lot of choice in the matter; we live in a plastic world. But there were some interesting alternatives on display at the Green Living Show in Toronto.

I was surprised by crowds and the level of interest in a Life Without Plastic at the booth with that very name. Co-founders Chantal and Jay, with backgrounds in law and biochemistry, write:

The environment and our bodies are regularly, and unfortunately increasingly, being bombarded by toxic human-made chemicals. As these chemicals accumulate in our bodies, they disrupt our health, even though we may not feel their actual physical effects for years following the exposure. If we can reduce the amount of plastic-derived chemicals entering our bodies, we believe this is a worthy step in the direction of improved global health.

Lloyd Alter/CC BY 2.0

The range of products available in stainless steel, glass and other alternatives to plastic was surprising. Available online at Life Without Plastic.

Barbara Taylor's water bottles/ Lloyd Alter/CC BY 2.0

We have shown the work of Barbara Taylor before, with her unglazed clay pottery designed to keep food without refrigeration. This year she introduces a water bottle, another of what she calls "revolutionary old technology":

By pouring water into the unglazed clay, the act of evaporation has a cooling effect. The clay water bottle will keep your water fresher as well by removing the chemical taste.

Plus, it would look very retro in my bike's water bottle holder.

Lloyd Alter/CC BY 2.0

Here is an idea that would make Jihyun Ryou and Kris De Decker at No Tech Magazine happy: a clay Veggie Keeper.

Tired of throwing out vegetables that spoil from an excess of condensation? Earth Works clay carrot will extend the freshness of delicate greens and vegetables.

Barbara notes that the carrots absorb the ethylene gas that causes some vegetables to ripen and others to rot. More at Earthworkspottery.com

Tags: Crafts | Plastics | Toronto

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