Japanese House Design "Reconstructs Relations Between Nature, Human and Architecture"

Sometimes Japanese modern houses look like, shall we say, a challenge to live in. Ryuichi Ashizawa Architects are building this on in Osaka on a 30 m2 (300 square foot) site- that is one and a half American parking spaces. Needless to say, the only way to go is up. Designboom writes:

The concept is based on sustainable systems. Structural columns intertwine like ivy supporting slabs on each floor. soil is put on the slabs to plant local plants of the area. Because fixed walls separate natural and human domains, they avoided constructing walls.
Instead, they uses traditional movable walls of japan like a shoji or a fusuma. Energy sources of the building are produced by natural power as light, wind, and rain. Ideally, the house could produce all the energy used in this building, and circulate them efficiently as tree circulates air. Minimized facility lines are provided to each floor going through the structural pipe of the columns. The environments exposed naturally calls back the primitive sense of modern people.
Images ryuichi ashizawa architects,photo by kaori ichikawa, via Designboom

Gathering sun and wind at the roof level

Are there no walls at all? only curtains and shojis?

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Tags: Architects | Japan