Is the Skyscraper an Anachronism?

I would have thought the answer was "yes"- they are huge energy hogs and the higher they go, the more elevators they need and less efficient they become. "Such buildings are utterly contrary to the requirements of times of increasingly insecure and dwindling oil supplies, in which even the United States must one day embrace the quest for more sustainable lifestyles and forms of development."Peter Buchanan thinks otherwise, and writes in the Harvard Design Magazine:

Reaching up into fresh air and abundant daylight, tall buildings cry out to be naturally lit and ventilated, bringing energy savings, healthier conditions, and more personal environmental control. Touching tall buildings is abundant ambient energy in the form of sunlight and wind, only a little of which needs to be harvested to serve all their energy needs.
He then describes a few European green towers like the Swiss Re Gherkin, and concludes with "Sustainability requires not only that we lessen our ecological impacts, but also that we create the urban and cultural frameworks in which we can attain full humanity, in contact with self, others, and nature." A long and thoughtful article at
::Harvard Design Magazine

Tags: London