Hugo Franca's Work with Reclaimed Wood

Hugo França was an employee at a computer company in Sao Paulo until he resigned his job and moved to northeast Brazil, where he spent 15 years learning the mysteries of working with wood.

From then on, França designs these impressive pieces of furniture from logs that have been burned out of left behind by lodgers or natural weather phenomena. How does he find them? Every 45 days, he goes back to his studio in Bahia and walks the jungle with local farmers and indigenous people, who guide him to abandoned trunks or sell him old canoes.

Read and see more pictures in the extended.

::Via The New York Times. All pictures by Paulo Fridman for the NYT, unless noted. The process França follows is simple: instead of doing sketches on computers or paper, when he gets his hands into a new piece of wood he spends several days thinking about what it might become by working on it with chalk.

"The most fascinating thing is when you start unearthing roots to see curves and shapes it reveals," França told Julia Chaplin, of the New York Times, in the mentioned article (linked in the 'Via' line).

Some of the Brazilian artist's work was exhibited at the Art Basel fair three years ago and inhabits rooms of collectors, magnates and other figures, including actor Will Smith. Other pieces are also part of the decoration in hotels like the Huntley in Santa Monica, the Tides in South Beach, or the Fasano in Rio de Janeiro (designed by Philippe Starck).

The price for this kind of luxury is high: $18,000 for a canoe chair to $100,000 for a 20-foot-long dining table.

Read more details at the original article. If you like this kind of work, check our previously featured Brazilian Lara Donatoni, who also uses reclaimed wood to make sculptures and pieces of art.

::An Old Friend of Ancient Wood

Table from an old trunk, by Hugo França.

Canoe chair, by Hugo França.

The artist sitting in one of its creations.

The source of França's work (picture by Andres Otero for the New York Times).

Tags: Artists | Benches | Brazil | Designers

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