How To Put A Building In Public Space: Put A Green Roof On It

Images credit Iwan Baan

I have previously complained that green roofs have become a form of greenwashing, used to put buildings where they shouldn't be by pretending to blend into the green environment surrounding it. But Diller Scofidio + Renfro's (with FXFOWLE) Hypar Pavilion in the North Plaza of Lincoln Center in New York is different: It is a green oasis. The President of the Center claimed it would help "to bring some green to our campus and soften the monumentality of our buildings." And it does.

The architects accomplish the difficult task of building a free-standing restaurant in the middle of the public space by creating a tilted hyperbolic paraboloid roof that meets the ground at one corner, turning it into a lush, green 7200 square foot tilted park that maintains the same amount of public space and actually improves it.

Elizabeth Diller explains:

"Hypar Pavilion's moment of invention came when we discovered how to design a destination restaurant without consuming public space on the Lincoln Center campus. The roof became a new kind of interface between public and private, with an occupiable twisting grass canopy over a glass pavilion restaurant."

Architectural reviewers have raved, but food reviewers have not, complaining that it felt more like the Starship Enterprise than a restaurant. But the exterior is another demonstration of how green roofs continue to change architecture, and this one gets it right. More images at DesignBoom and DSMY

More on Green Roofs Changing Architecture (And Being Used As Greenwash)
Green Roofs are Changing Architecture and Planning
Are Green Roofs the New Mirrored Glass?
JDS Architects' Rimini Seascape :Green Roofs are Changing Architecture
More Green Roof Greenwash: Gary Neville's Teletubby House
Green Roofs + Green Belts = Greenwash

Tags: Architects | Green Roofs | New York City