High Line-Inspired New Elevated Park Will Bring Green And Pedestrian-Friendly Infrastructure To Mexico City


Images: Federal District Public Space Authority of Mexico.
Our extensive coverage of the High Line park in New York City proves how much TreeHuggers love elevated urban parks that bring new green to cities without occupying floor space.

Mexico City seems to have taken note on the success of the project and has recently announced plans to build a broad garden path across two major urban arteries.
Interviewed by Fox News Latino, the general coordinator for the city's Public Space Authority Daniel Escotto Sanchez said: "The High Line in New York seemed to me a fresh breath of air, completely. Within so many streets, so many avenues, Mexico City just needs respite like this."

According to the announced plans, the new elevated structure will link a metro station to the city's largest park: the Chapultepec Forest. But although the renderings bear clear coincidences with the High Line, there will be a main difference: Mexico's will be built from scratch and not recycled from an old rail road like the High Line. Another particular sign is that the project is promoted by city officials and not citizens.

Supposed to be an "arm of the forest", the new park will allow pedestrians to cross an intersection of busy roads and passageways that are not usually friendly for passers by and families wanting to go to the Chapultepec Forest's picnic areas. "What we want is a message that says the walker has the same dignity as the vehicle," said Sanchez to Fox News Latino.

Estimated cost of the project is $4,3 million, to be financed by the construction company that's building the highway. The plan is to start it in December or January, and it could be finished in four months.


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Tags: Mexico | Urban Life | Urban Planning | Walking

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