Design from Iceland at Kraum, From the Sublime to Ridiculous

Lloyd Alter/CC BY 2.0

Kraum is in the oldest house in Reykjavik, built in 1762. Such a perfect place to show some of the newest and most interesting designers in Iceland.

Lloyd Alter/CC BY 2.0

Renovated in 2006, it certainly doesn't look old inside.

Lloyd Alter/CC BY 2.0

I was particularly taken with the fish lights by Dögg Guðmundsdóttir, designed in collaboration with Fanney E Antosdóttir, but most of the people I was travelling with put it smack in the ridiculous category.

Lloyd Alter/CC BY 2.0

A classic design is Sigurdur Mar Helgason's Fuzzy from 1972;

A charming foot-stool with stubby screw-on-legs and a long-haired wool seat that evokes a traditional mainstay of the Icelandic economy, sheep. Helgason lobbied to sell fuzzy, which fit snugly into a portable hot-pink box, at the duty-free shop at Keflavik airport, his logic being that visitors taking home a bottle of Icelandic brennivin, a local schnapps, might add fuzzy to their collection of souvenirs. Fuzzy never made it to the duty-free shelf, becoming instead a popular local gift for confirmations and graduations. The story of this whimsical creation exemplifies a trait typical of contemporary Icelandic design: its pioneering spirit.

Lloyd Alter/CC BY 2.0

Bility is the brand from Studiobility, "a unique experimental design studio established in 2005 by Guðrún Lilja Gunnlaugsdóttir and Jón Ásgeir Hreinsson." Most of the very clever designs appear to be laser cut out of stainless steel.

© Bility

This is the only thing I bought in Iceland, the book snail by Runa Thors.

Lloyd Alter/CC BY 2.0

One item not made from stainless is this cardboard Message in a Bottle, designed by Guðrún Lilja. Given that I only had five hours in Reykjavik, Kraum was a design find.

Tags: Designers | Iceland

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