Because There Is No "Rest" in "Restoration"

There has been a lot of demolition going on as houses are demolished for new monsters or renovated, and a number of different ways to get rid of the stuff that comes out, much of which has value. Usually the better ways to ensure re-use are Habitat for Humanity or non-profit deconstruction companies. An interesting idea out of Chicago joins the mix: Murco Recycling holds auctions of the building components, IN PLACE, in the house to be stripped. It has a loyal base, a "consolidated, well educated, group of buyers that show up on the day of auction, with tools, transportation and cash." And, they have to strip the stuff out and take it away by 5:00 the same day. Themselves. The gang of customers is known as the Homewreckers Club; "They'll take it all; the bushes, the windows-they'll take a nail out of a board if it's the kind they were looking for," says one builder clearing a site for a monster home.

According to the Chicago Tribune:

"Half the fun is in the destruction. At a recent Murco sale in Park Ridge, a man crouched down with a crowbar to yank the vintage baseboards off the living room walls. His 3 1/2-year-old son, meanwhile, carefully aimed Dad's hammer at the walls, swung and punched an apple-size hole in the plaster. Then another, and another. "Daddy, we're making a big mess," the boy said between whacks at the wall. What the heck-paid professionals would arrive a few days later to take down whatever walls Junior didn't demolish."

I do have some concerns. In Canada, the construction safety people would close this down in twenty seconds, yet in the more litigious United States people are wearing running shoes instead of steel toed boots, and lots of people without hard hats. I see one person pulling up nails with a crowbar without safety glasses or steel toed boots. And 3-1/2 year old children swinging hammers on a construction site? Fun, but nuts. Perhaps this needs a little more thought. And insurance.
::Murco Recycling
via ::Apartment Therapy

Tags: Chicago | Demolition | Recycling

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