Art-O-Mat Seeks Florida Artists

Original art can be expensive, so we get a culture of artless people and starving artists. Clark Whittington is trying to change that. He recycles old cigarette machines and turns them into "Art-O-Mats, dispensing objets d'art at five bucks a pop. ''In many cases, Art-o-Mat is the first time artists have sold art and the first time a buyer has bought art,'' Whittington told the Miami Herald.
Erin Lee

In the twelve years since the first Art-O-Mat was installed, hundreds of artists from around the world have filled almost a hundred machines. And it isn't small change; evidently two single moms from Bangladesh made enough money from hand-knit dolls to support their families for a year.


Acryliture

Whittington told Cammy Clark of the Herald:

''When artists find out this is run by an artist, then they understand maybe why the money is not so great,'' Whittington said. ``It's more about public relations and proliferation of their work.''

It's also about making art accessible to all. 'At my first machine, a police officer told me, `Well, your art is right smart,' '' Whittington recalled. ``It's not a term critics use, not a term Picasso would use. But it opened my eyes that it was reaching people who may never have been exposed to art before.''



Woodie Anderson

More in the Miami Herald

See more vending in TreeHugger:

The Swap-O-Matic
Envirobank’s Reverse Vending Machines

Tags: Artists