ThredUp Concierge Recycles Your Kids Clothing and Gives Cash Back, Too

© ThredUp

ThredUp's is taking their popular secondhand marketplace platform where you can buy and sell children's clothes and toys online to the next level with a soon-to-launch program called ThredUp Concierge. It boasts the best features of ThredUp, such as free shipping and the ease of not leaving your house, plus a greater incentive to send in some high quality goodies. For each item, ThredUp offers up to $5 for any item they can re-sell on their marketplace and for each bag donated, they'll make a cash donation to Coats for Kids, too. Currently, it's invite-only but we have a secret code that will get you started now:

© ThredUp

To get started, order a bag by going at ThredUp Concierge; enter code TREEHUGGER; fill the bag with gently used children's clothing; schedule a pickup on the Concierge website, where they'll take care of the clothes from there.

So what's actually different between ThredUp and the new Concierge program? Essentially it's the same idea: you get free shipping bags to stuff Chock full o'Clothes, and you get money back for each bag, up to $10 on ThredUp and up to $5 for each garment on ThredUp Concierge. In short, there's greater earning potential with Concierge. Plus, you don't have to list your items online, wait for someone to order the box of clothes, and when they do, send it directly to that customer (postage paid by the buyer), according to a spokesperson for ThredUp.

© ThredUp

The program is like Buffalo Exchange's in-store re-sale policy--that gives you money back for clothing, on the spot, based on value--but easier, especially for clothing that you care little for, since If you really want to get the big bucks, i.e., a more competitive price, a consignment shop would be a far better choice. But for times when you want re-sell clothing that your youngster is rapidly outgrowing, you can do so on Concierge without having to leave the house.

At the end of the day, what Concierge really has to offer is convenience and the potential to earn money for your effort. On the website, ThredUp compares the platform to consignment, Craigslist, and eBay, claiming that their platform beats out their competition. It also points out that it is an easier alternative to sharing hand-me-downs with friends and family, which may be true but sharing and passing on items is well worth the extra effort as it fosters the idea of community and sharing clothing that has sentimental value.

This article was updated on January 21, 2012: a former version of this article stated that you could receive up to $20 per bag on ThredUp when, in fact, you can receive up to $10 per bag.

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Tags: Clothing | Shopping | Sustainable Fabrics