In New York, Awamaki Lab to Host Peruvian Crafting Workshop and Reveal Second Andean Fashion Collection

© Awamaki Lab

Following the success of their inaugural fashion collection, Peruvian non-profit Awamaki Lab will reveal their much-anticipated second collection January 27, 2012 at the Textile Arts Center in New York City. To coincide with the event, Awamaki Lab designers Andria Crescioni and Courtney Cedarholm and sewing instructor Tara Banerjee, also known as the Williamsburg Seamster, will host a crafting workshop the day before.

At the crafting workshop, DIYers will get the chance to transform textile remnants into accessories, including zipped key pouches, heart-shaped pin cushions, and more. Each pattern has been designed by a member of Awamaki Lab's sewing co-operative in Peru. Fortunately, no sewing experience is necessary to take part.

© Awamaki Lab

Attendeed will get a glimpse at Awamaki's work in Ollantaytambo, Peru and they'll receive the same vocational training that Awamaki provides for their seamstresses. The class takes place on Thursday, January 26th, 6:30 - 9:30pm at the Textile Arts Center in Manhattan (26 West 8th Street) and costs $20 to attend--register, here.

The next day, buzzed about designer Andria Crescioni will reveal her Fall/Winter 2012 collection for Awamaki Lab, which she co-designed with fellow Parsons alumn Courtney Cedarholm. Crescioni's collection comes hot off the heels of her collaboration with Loomstate in which she designed a zero-waste anarok.

© Awamaki Lab

Annie Millican, director of Awamaki Lab, sent over a sneak peek of Fall/Winter 2012 and if the rest of the collection is anything like the pictures, these designers could prove to be just what Awamaki Lab needs to put them on the fashion map.

The inaugural collection, designed by Nieli Vallin, established that the design and production model--where designers work with impoverished Quencha women weavers and develop contemporary clothing for a western market using fair trade textiles--worked but the clothing was tired, hardly wearable, and definitely not fashionable. One look at the photo, above, is enough to prove that Awamaki Lab's designs have grown leaps and bounds in the past year: the tailoring is spot-on; the use of opposing textiles is balanced; and it's something you could actually picture in a magazine or on the streets of New York City.

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Tags: Clothing | New York City | Sustainable Fabrics